Eva Gutierrez of Disc Dogs in Southern California participates in a dog show where she throws frisbees to Lanakila, the dog, at the 16th annual Bow-Wows & Meows Pet Fair at William S. Hart Park on Sunday. Nikolas Samuels/The Signal
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Pets took center stage Sunday during the 16th annual Bow-Wows & Meows Pet Fair at William S. Hart Park.

All seven shelters that make up L.A. County Animal Care and Control brought dogs, cats and other animals that were available for adoption, according to Yvonne Allbee, founder of Bow-Wows & Meows.

“We are going to celebrate pets (and) we are going to encourage animal wellness,” she said.

Allbee expected to have more than 15,000 people provide homes for over 200 animals this year.

One such person who was looking at the dogs for adoption was Kourtney Phillips, who attended the pet fair with her dog and boyfriend. She won’t adopt just any dog though.

“It has to be the right dog,” she said.

Shayna Mintz holds the leash of her pitbull, Rosie, at the 16th annual Bow-Wows & Meows Pet Fair at William S. Hart Park on Sunday.
Shayna Mintz holds the leash of her pit bull, Rosie, at the 16th annual Bow-Wows & Meows Pet Fair at William S. Hart Park on Sunday.

Nonetheless, she was still happy to see so many dogs get an opportunity to find a home.

“It breaks my heart because they are so loving,” she said. “They deserve a home.”

The pet fair was full of entertainment such as vendors, dog shows, music and the overall comradery that comes with animal lovers meeting together.

Local resident Cindy Daniel came with her rescue dog, Penny Lane, as well as her daughter and browsed through the vendors for something special for Penny.

“I promised (my dog) a treat or a toy,” Daniel said.  

The event started with just seven adoptions the first year and has grown into a pet extravaganza where hundreds of dogs find a home. Allbee can’t help but feel pride at what the event has become.

 “It’s the end of the day when the shelter trucks come back empty that we finally let ourselves go,” she said.  

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