Volunteers spend countless hours sharing heritage

By Samie Gebers

Last update: Sunday, February 5th, 2017

Docents, volunteers and club members have put in countless hours at the Heritage Junction at William S. Hart. Park, working on buildings, searching for furniture and sharing the area’s past with the public.

“We don’t consider them tours, we consider them opportunities to share our heritage with the community,” said Cynthia Harris, President of the Heritage chapter of the Questers, an international group focusing on the preservation and restoration of historical locations or items.

On the first Sunday of every month, there are free, docent-led tours that are available to the public through historical buildings, some even older than 100 years.

Fritz Grayson has been a docent at the Heritage Junction for six years and sits in the Callahan Schoolhouse at Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park on Sunday. Samie Gebers/ Signal

“I think we just have a feeling of wanting to share what life used to be like and how we can compare it to today’s life,” Harris said.

Some of the docents have been there for years, like Fritz Grayson, a 6-year member of Questers who is especially fond of giving tours through the Callahan Schoolhouse.

“One begins to appreciate where we are today so much better if we understand where we were back then,” Fritz Grayson said.

Libby Hinze, a Questers member for 11 years, describes a sewing box from the 1920’s for the camera at the Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park on Sunday. Samie Gebers/Signal

Instead of relaxing and watching the first part of the Super Bowl, six docents were ready to provide the public knowledge of Santa Clarita history.

They say that the sacrifice of their time is worth it, especially when they see student reaction to what was.

“When they don’t see the video games or they don’t see the television and they can’t imagine how a child can entertain themselves,” said Harris.

Such children were 5-year-old Brody Martinez and 9-year-old Ava Martinez who were brought by their mother, Jaime Martinez, for an educational trip.

“They’re just enjoying learning about Santa Clarita,” Jaime Martinez said.

“Really, we had no idea how much history is here, so it’s kind of eye opening for everybody.”

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Volunteers spend countless hours sharing heritage

Ann Grayson, right, describes contents sitting on a dresser that is more than 100 years old to Ava Martinez, 9, and Brody Martinez, 5, at the Heritage Junction at William S. Hart Park on Sunday. Samie Gebers/ Signal

Docents, volunteers and club members have put in countless hours at the Heritage Junction at William S. Hart. Park, working on buildings, searching for furniture and sharing the area’s past with the public.

“We don’t consider them tours, we consider them opportunities to share our heritage with the community,” said Cynthia Harris, President of the Heritage chapter of the Questers, an international group focusing on the preservation and restoration of historical locations or items.

On the first Sunday of every month, there are free, docent-led tours that are available to the public through historical buildings, some even older than 100 years.

Fritz Grayson has been a docent at the Heritage Junction for six years and sits in the Callahan Schoolhouse at Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park on Sunday. Samie Gebers/ Signal

“I think we just have a feeling of wanting to share what life used to be like and how we can compare it to today’s life,” Harris said.

Some of the docents have been there for years, like Fritz Grayson, a 6-year member of Questers who is especially fond of giving tours through the Callahan Schoolhouse.

“One begins to appreciate where we are today so much better if we understand where we were back then,” Fritz Grayson said.

Libby Hinze, a Questers member for 11 years, describes a sewing box from the 1920’s for the camera at the Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park on Sunday. Samie Gebers/Signal

Instead of relaxing and watching the first part of the Super Bowl, six docents were ready to provide the public knowledge of Santa Clarita history.

They say that the sacrifice of their time is worth it, especially when they see student reaction to what was.

“When they don’t see the video games or they don’t see the television and they can’t imagine how a child can entertain themselves,” said Harris.

Such children were 5-year-old Brody Martinez and 9-year-old Ava Martinez who were brought by their mother, Jaime Martinez, for an educational trip.

“They’re just enjoying learning about Santa Clarita,” Jaime Martinez said.

“Really, we had no idea how much history is here, so it’s kind of eye opening for everybody.”

About the author

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers is currently studying broadcast journalism at College of the Canyons. She reports on the weekends as well as produces video content during the week.

  • Summer O’Brien

    Very nice story and photos.

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers is currently studying broadcast journalism at College of the Canyons. She reports on the weekends as well as produces video content during the week.