Knight officially re-introduces ‘Heroes’ bill

By Kevin Kenney

Last update: Thursday, February 16th, 2017

As he promised in an exclusive Signal story a day earlier, Rep. Steve Knight on Thursday re-introduced his No Hero Left Untreated Act on the House floor in Washington.

The bill — with 50 co-sponsors instead of the anticipated 47, across both parties — would begin a one-year pilot program to help veterans suffering post-traumatic stress and other brain issues, as well as opiate addiction.

The programs would use new, high-tech but still experimental neurological treatments known as Magnetic Resonance Therapy, or MRT.

“The No Hero Left Untreated Act would support and expand on promising technology to bring relief to our heroes, which is why it received widespread support last Congress,” Knight, a Republican who represents Santa Clarita’s 25th Congressional District, said in a statement.

“I look forward to building on that momentum and working with my colleagues to ensure that we get our service men and women the treatment they deserve.”

Knight’s original bill passed the House last year and got bipartisan sponsorship in the Senate, but Congress recessed before the upper chamber could vote on it.

For a bill to become law, it must pass both houses of Congress in the same session, which necessitated Knight re-introducing the measure.

The new measure now awaits committee assignment.

kkenney@signalscv.com

(661) 287-5525

 

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Knight officially re-introduces ‘Heroes’ bill

Congressman Steve Knight. Dan Watson/The Signal

As he promised in an exclusive Signal story a day earlier, Rep. Steve Knight on Thursday re-introduced his No Hero Left Untreated Act on the House floor in Washington.

The bill — with 50 co-sponsors instead of the anticipated 47, across both parties — would begin a one-year pilot program to help veterans suffering post-traumatic stress and other brain issues, as well as opiate addiction.

The programs would use new, high-tech but still experimental neurological treatments known as Magnetic Resonance Therapy, or MRT.

“The No Hero Left Untreated Act would support and expand on promising technology to bring relief to our heroes, which is why it received widespread support last Congress,” Knight, a Republican who represents Santa Clarita’s 25th Congressional District, said in a statement.

“I look forward to building on that momentum and working with my colleagues to ensure that we get our service men and women the treatment they deserve.”

Knight’s original bill passed the House last year and got bipartisan sponsorship in the Senate, but Congress recessed before the upper chamber could vote on it.

For a bill to become law, it must pass both houses of Congress in the same session, which necessitated Knight re-introducing the measure.

The new measure now awaits committee assignment.

kkenney@signalscv.com

(661) 287-5525

 

About the author

Kevin Kenney

Kevin Kenney

Over 30-plus years, Kevin Kenney has been a writer and editor for United Press International, the New York Post and Fox Sports, among other outlets. He joined The Signal in 2016.

Kevin Kenney

Kevin Kenney

Over 30-plus years, Kevin Kenney has been a writer and editor for United Press International, the New York Post and Fox Sports, among other outlets. He joined The Signal in 2016.