NYC Subways turn into Entertainment

If you live in the NYC, then chances are high that you must have seen a smorgasbord of advertisements on the subway platforms. With billions of people commuting annually, there is no surprise why advertisers have their focus on subway stations. While they are at a profit, what about the commuters? What if they want to see something else on those billboards, something more creative than the latest movies to catch up?

Well, if this sounds like you, then try “Heavy AR”. An augmented reality app, Heavy AR can replace those boring advertisements with some amazing pieces of art. Available both for iOS and Android users, this free app works like a charm. All that you need to do is to install it on your smartphone or tablet, open it and use your device’s camera and place it over the ad you want to replace with a magnificent artwork.

The real attraction here is the ease of use that this app offers. Within seconds you will see the physical billboard turning into an artwork. The advent of Heavy AR has heralded a change in the way subway users witness their surroundings. So, your wait for that subway train is no longer dull. It is an experience worth cherishing.

Heavy AR is an initiative of Republic Lab , a team headed by Jordan Seiler and Jowy Romano. The team centers around technology and AR to provide a new world to the tech users. While Heavy AR has collaborated with 50 artists for this project, more partnerships are on the way.

Once you settle on the app and use it, you will realize how Re+Public intends to make your world all the more beautiful by embracing technology. However, note that the app won’t work on an altered ad or on an ad that has graffiti. And, the app also doesn’t work in case there is a single, dominant advertiser, or if an ad has not yet been catalogued in the system.

That said, more than 100 advertisements have been turned subway compatible with the app and the future seems quite promising. All in all, Heavy AR is a delightful app that easily transforms the looks of subways — making them all the more creative and colorful for commuters who seek respite from commercial advertisements.

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