Bridge to Home voices support for Measure H

By Christina Cox

Last update: Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

Bridge to Home, which provides support services to homeless individuals and families in Santa Clarita, officially announced its endorsement of Measure H at a press conference Thursday.

“We are really invested in this measure and making sure it happens,” said Silvia Gutierrez, executive director of Bridge to Home.

Measure H, the Los Angeles County plan to prevent and combat homelessness, would raise sales tax county-wide by one-quarter of a cent for 10 years to support various services, preventative programs and housing for homeless children, families, youth, veterans, seniors, battered women and disabled individuals.

Bridge to Home voiced its support for the measure, on the ballot March 7, with representatives from the Domestic Violence Center of Santa Clarita, Yes on H Campaign and LA Family Housing, PATH (People Assisting the Homeless).

“What Measure H does is provide a funding strain (stream) that will help Bridge to Home and the Santa Clarita community deal more effectively with year-round issues and help with those who are experiencing homelessness,” said Hunt Braly, president of the Bridge to Home Governing Board.

A conservative republican, Braly said Santa Clarita voters should support the measure because it will help fund services in the Santa Clarita Valley, will only last for 10 years and requires a two-thirds majority vote.

“The money that will be made available for this will come in part to Santa Clarita,” he said.  “It’s important for all of us who live in this community to be supportive of a program that will be helping this community and this county.”

Linda Davies, Executive Director of the Domestic Violence Center of Santa Clarita Valley, center, joins a group of supporters for a yes vote on Measure H during a press conference held at the Bridge to Home office in Newhall on Thursday. Dan Watson/The Signal

Linda Davies, executive director of Domestic Violence Center, said her organization supports the measure as well because of the preventative services and affordable housing options it will provide to those in need, including women who have left a domestic violence situation.

“We know that there are 8,000 women a year that are domestic violence survivors that are back out on the streets because they have nowhere to go when they leave their domestic violence situation,” Davies said. “We believe that these preventative services will be incredibly helpful for that.”

Katie Hill, deputy CEO of PATH, said homelessness affects families, students, veterans and teenagers in Santa Clarita who live in the wash or out of their cars.

“As someone who grew up in Santa Clarita, I know how easy it is to dismiss homelessness as a problem that doesn’t affect our community,” Hill said.  “Homelessness isn’t a distant problem that we here in our safe, wonderful, clean city can ignore.  It is affecting our very own neighbors and community members.”

Hill said she also supports the measure because it provides individuals with “a hand up and not a hand out.”

“We know from experience that services combined with permanent housing is the only way to end homelessness,” said Christina Miller, director of SPA 2 CES for LA Family Housing.  “That is what Measure H will do.”

 

ccox@signalscv.com
661-287-5575
On Twitter as @_ChristinaCox_

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Bridge to Home voices support for Measure H

Bridge to Home Board President Hunt Braly, Center, and Bridge to Home Executive Director Silvia Gutierrez, right, speak in favor of a yes vote on Measure H during a press conference held at the Bridge to Home office in Newhall on Thursday. Dan Watson/The Signal

Bridge to Home, which provides support services to homeless individuals and families in Santa Clarita, officially announced its endorsement of Measure H at a press conference Thursday.

“We are really invested in this measure and making sure it happens,” said Silvia Gutierrez, executive director of Bridge to Home.

Measure H, the Los Angeles County plan to prevent and combat homelessness, would raise sales tax county-wide by one-quarter of a cent for 10 years to support various services, preventative programs and housing for homeless children, families, youth, veterans, seniors, battered women and disabled individuals.

Bridge to Home voiced its support for the measure, on the ballot March 7, with representatives from the Domestic Violence Center of Santa Clarita, Yes on H Campaign and LA Family Housing, PATH (People Assisting the Homeless).

“What Measure H does is provide a funding strain (stream) that will help Bridge to Home and the Santa Clarita community deal more effectively with year-round issues and help with those who are experiencing homelessness,” said Hunt Braly, president of the Bridge to Home Governing Board.

A conservative republican, Braly said Santa Clarita voters should support the measure because it will help fund services in the Santa Clarita Valley, will only last for 10 years and requires a two-thirds majority vote.

“The money that will be made available for this will come in part to Santa Clarita,” he said.  “It’s important for all of us who live in this community to be supportive of a program that will be helping this community and this county.”

Linda Davies, Executive Director of the Domestic Violence Center of Santa Clarita Valley, center, joins a group of supporters for a yes vote on Measure H during a press conference held at the Bridge to Home office in Newhall on Thursday. Dan Watson/The Signal

Linda Davies, executive director of Domestic Violence Center, said her organization supports the measure as well because of the preventative services and affordable housing options it will provide to those in need, including women who have left a domestic violence situation.

“We know that there are 8,000 women a year that are domestic violence survivors that are back out on the streets because they have nowhere to go when they leave their domestic violence situation,” Davies said. “We believe that these preventative services will be incredibly helpful for that.”

Katie Hill, deputy CEO of PATH, said homelessness affects families, students, veterans and teenagers in Santa Clarita who live in the wash or out of their cars.

“As someone who grew up in Santa Clarita, I know how easy it is to dismiss homelessness as a problem that doesn’t affect our community,” Hill said.  “Homelessness isn’t a distant problem that we here in our safe, wonderful, clean city can ignore.  It is affecting our very own neighbors and community members.”

Hill said she also supports the measure because it provides individuals with “a hand up and not a hand out.”

“We know from experience that services combined with permanent housing is the only way to end homelessness,” said Christina Miller, director of SPA 2 CES for LA Family Housing.  “That is what Measure H will do.”

 

ccox@signalscv.com
661-287-5575
On Twitter as @_ChristinaCox_

About the author

Christina Cox

Christina Cox

Christina Cox is a multimedia journalist covering education, community and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in August 2016.

  • Ron Bischof

    “… will only last for 10 years…”

    Sure. Does anyone actually believe that?

    These organizations mean well but are reciting platitudes and appeals to emotion in the belief that they’ll do good with whatever funding trickles down from County coffers.

    Measure H will waste tremendous sums of money on administrative overhead and do little to actually help the homeless that are ready to be helped. It will remove hundreds of millions of dollars out of the productive economy annually.

    See: War on Poverty.

Christina Cox

Christina Cox

Christina Cox is a multimedia journalist covering education, community and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in August 2016.