City provides tips to help beat the heat
A skateboarder makes a loop around the bowl at the Santa Clarita Skate Park on Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Katharine Lotze/The Signal
By Gina Ender
Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

With the first day of summer fast approaching, hot temperatures are already forecast for the week in Santa Clarita.

According to the National Weather Service, there will be a high of 93 °F on Wednesday, 96 °F on Thursday, 100 °F on Friday and 97 °F on Saturday – and then the temps are expected to rise again.

People can possibly expect triple digit temperatures into next week.

Santa Clarita Emergency Services Supervisor Donna Nuzzi said it is crucial that community members stay cool and take proper precautions when temperatures rise in the valley.

The Senior Center, local libraries and the mall are all good locations to find air conditioning, Nuzzi said. She also encourages neighbors and friends to congregate indoors.

“Be a good neighbor,” Nuzzi said. “Check in on people. Have a good buddy system and make sure they are okay.”

Public places may be declared “cooling centers” in the city, Nuzzi said, if Los Angeles County Public Health deems the heat threshold high enough to necessitate them. This usually occurs when there are high temperatures late into the day several days in a row.

Senior citizens and young children are especially vulnerable to heat, she said, so it is crucial to be mindful of the care of those groups when it gets hot outside.

Before temperatures escalate further, it is imperative to begin hydrating by drinking lots of water and not wait until temperatures are at their highest, Nuzzi said.

When out in the sun, Nuzzi suggests wearing colorful clothing, a wide-brimmed hat or holding an umbrella and wearing at least 30 SPF sunblock.

She also encourages those who choose to workout outdoors not to do so from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

When eating, Nuzzi said to avoid heavy and hot meals and to limit caffeine and alcohol intake, both of which are dehydrating.

If someone is feeling weak or dizzy because of heat exhaustion, Nuzzi suggests laying down, using a cool compress and going to a doctor if symptoms worsen.

gender@signalscv.com

661-287-5525

On Twitter as @ginaender

About the author

Gina Ender

Gina Ender

Gina Ender is a journalist covering city government and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in February 2017. You can contact Gina Ender at gender@signalscv.com, 661-287-5525 or follow her on Twitter at @ginaender.

A skateboarder makes a loop around the bowl at the Santa Clarita Skate Park on Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

City provides tips to help beat the heat

With the first day of summer fast approaching, hot temperatures are already forecast for the week in Santa Clarita.

According to the National Weather Service, there will be a high of 93 °F on Wednesday, 96 °F on Thursday, 100 °F on Friday and 97 °F on Saturday – and then the temps are expected to rise again.

People can possibly expect triple digit temperatures into next week.

Santa Clarita Emergency Services Supervisor Donna Nuzzi said it is crucial that community members stay cool and take proper precautions when temperatures rise in the valley.

The Senior Center, local libraries and the mall are all good locations to find air conditioning, Nuzzi said. She also encourages neighbors and friends to congregate indoors.

“Be a good neighbor,” Nuzzi said. “Check in on people. Have a good buddy system and make sure they are okay.”

Public places may be declared “cooling centers” in the city, Nuzzi said, if Los Angeles County Public Health deems the heat threshold high enough to necessitate them. This usually occurs when there are high temperatures late into the day several days in a row.

Senior citizens and young children are especially vulnerable to heat, she said, so it is crucial to be mindful of the care of those groups when it gets hot outside.

Before temperatures escalate further, it is imperative to begin hydrating by drinking lots of water and not wait until temperatures are at their highest, Nuzzi said.

When out in the sun, Nuzzi suggests wearing colorful clothing, a wide-brimmed hat or holding an umbrella and wearing at least 30 SPF sunblock.

She also encourages those who choose to workout outdoors not to do so from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

When eating, Nuzzi said to avoid heavy and hot meals and to limit caffeine and alcohol intake, both of which are dehydrating.

If someone is feeling weak or dizzy because of heat exhaustion, Nuzzi suggests laying down, using a cool compress and going to a doctor if symptoms worsen.

gender@signalscv.com

661-287-5525

On Twitter as @ginaender

About the author

Gina Ender

Gina Ender

Gina Ender is a journalist covering city government and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in February 2017. You can contact Gina Ender at gender@signalscv.com, 661-287-5525 or follow her on Twitter at @ginaender.