A car drives through flooded streets at Del Valle Road and Hasley Canyon Road Monday morning. Austin Dave/The Signal
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someonePrint this pageShare on RedditShare on Google+

Another storm system hit the Santa Clarita Valley Monday morning, slowing traffic on the freeways and causing flooding on city streets.

Commuters experienced slowed traffic on the southbound Interstate 5, just south of Calgrove Boulevard, when a series of potholes appeared in the No. 4 and 5 lanes of the freeway.

Witnesses reported seeing cars with flat tires on the side of the road from driving over the interstate’s potholes.

A car drives through flooded streets at Del Valle Road and Hasley Canyon Road Monday morning. Austin Dave/The Signal

The rain also brought flooding to Del Valle Road and Hasley Canyon Road before 9 a.m.

Officials with the California Highway Patrol almost closed the road; however, held off doing so as drivers could make their way through the flooded streets.

According to 24-hour rain totals from the NWS, Del Valle and Newhall received 0.83 inches of rain, and Saugus received 0.37 inches of rain.

The National Weather Service (NWS) forecast projects that the rain will continue into Tuesday and possibly Wednesday morning, with a 50 percent chance of showers Tuesday.

Gusty winds will accompany the storm with south winds at 10 to 20 miles per hour (mph) and gusts up to 30 mph, according to the NWS.

Temperatures are expected to reach highs in the mid-60s and lows in the low-50s throughout the week before a chance of rain returns Friday morning.

ccox@signalscv.com
661-287-5575
On Twitter as @_ChristinaCox_

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someonePrint this pageShare on RedditShare on Google+
Christina Cox
Christina Cox is a multimedia journalist covering education, community and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in August 2016.
Comments
By commenting, you agree to our terms and conditions.
  • K. Hebert

    Another inaccurate alleged news story, for example: “Witnesses reported seeing cars with flat tires on the side of the road from driving over the interstate’s potholes.” Really? Did your reporter actually ask these “alleged” witnesses if they personally witnessed the car strike the pothole and then get a flat tire? Who are these nameless witnesses? Why would a reasonable, uninvolved, human being hang around the vicinity after a car “allegedly” got a flat tire from hitting a pothole? Better question, if the potholes (which have been there a lot longer than just when the rain came) are on the freeway, and your photo shows a vehicle on the side of a surface street, did these “alleged” witnesses follow our affected motorists off the freeway and wait around for an hour, all in the hopes a Signal reporter would come around and ask them if they saw a car get a flat tire from a pothole?

    Pathetic! I am sure your left leaning rag which specializes in sensationalizing non-news and reporting unvetted information will delete my post, despite the fact it DOES NOT violate your “terms and conditions” for posting. #FAKENEWS