Hazardous fuel burn underway in Angeles National Forest

By Christina Cox

Last update: Thursday, March 9th, 2017

Santa Clarita Valley residents in the Castaic Lake area may see smoke in the air Thursday as fire crews from the Angeles National Forest burn piles of infected wood or “hazardous fuels.”

Nathan Judy, a fire information officer with the Angeles National Forest, said the crews are burning about 45 trees that were infected with the Goldspotted Oak Borer, an invasive pest that is known for killing oak trees in California.

Angeles National Forest Captain 39 Rene Velazquez points to where the Goldspotted Oak Borer beetles like to feed and lay their eggs on oak trees that were cut down due to the beetle infestation in Green Valley on Thursday, March 9, 2017. They are working to keep the infestation contained, and prevent it from spreading further south. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

“We’ve had pile burns so we’ve been burning piles of wood in the area that was affected by the Goldspotted Oak Borer,” he said,  “It was an infestation of some oak trees in the area.”

A curtain burner, on loan from the Cleveland National Forest, burns wood from Goldspotted Oak Borer beetle-infested oak trees in Green Valley on Thursday, March 9. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

To burn the trees, fire crews are using a curtain burner, or FireBox, which controls the amount of pollution in the air during an open burn.

“We’ve been cutting the oak trees and putting them in a curtain burner, which is a machine to put wood into to minimize smoke and kill off any larvae left in the wood,” Judy said.

Oak trees with thinning canopies, right, are a sign that they are infested with Goldspotted Oak Borer (GSOB) beetles. Angeles National Forest workers are removing a grove of infested trees in Green Valley this week. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

Judy said the process of cutting down and burning the infected oak trees began on Monday and may continue for the rest of the week, depending on the weather.

ccox@signalscv.com
661-287-5575
On Twitter as @_ChristinaCox_

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Hazardous fuel burn underway in Angeles National Forest

Angeles National Forest fire crews reduce hazardous fuels using a curtain burner. Twitter photo

Santa Clarita Valley residents in the Castaic Lake area may see smoke in the air Thursday as fire crews from the Angeles National Forest burn piles of infected wood or “hazardous fuels.”

Nathan Judy, a fire information officer with the Angeles National Forest, said the crews are burning about 45 trees that were infected with the Goldspotted Oak Borer, an invasive pest that is known for killing oak trees in California.

Angeles National Forest Captain 39 Rene Velazquez points to where the Goldspotted Oak Borer beetles like to feed and lay their eggs on oak trees that were cut down due to the beetle infestation in Green Valley on Thursday, March 9, 2017. They are working to keep the infestation contained, and prevent it from spreading further south. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

“We’ve had pile burns so we’ve been burning piles of wood in the area that was affected by the Goldspotted Oak Borer,” he said,  “It was an infestation of some oak trees in the area.”

A curtain burner, on loan from the Cleveland National Forest, burns wood from Goldspotted Oak Borer beetle-infested oak trees in Green Valley on Thursday, March 9. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

To burn the trees, fire crews are using a curtain burner, or FireBox, which controls the amount of pollution in the air during an open burn.

“We’ve been cutting the oak trees and putting them in a curtain burner, which is a machine to put wood into to minimize smoke and kill off any larvae left in the wood,” Judy said.

Oak trees with thinning canopies, right, are a sign that they are infested with Goldspotted Oak Borer (GSOB) beetles. Angeles National Forest workers are removing a grove of infested trees in Green Valley this week. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

Judy said the process of cutting down and burning the infected oak trees began on Monday and may continue for the rest of the week, depending on the weather.

ccox@signalscv.com
661-287-5575
On Twitter as @_ChristinaCox_

About the author

Christina Cox

Christina Cox

Christina Cox is a multimedia journalist covering education, community and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in August 2016.

Christina Cox

Christina Cox

Christina Cox is a multimedia journalist covering education, community and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in August 2016.