CIF strikes some wording in bylaws regarding athletically motivated transfers

By Mason Nesbitt

Last update: Monday, April 10th, 2017

At its meeting in Ontario over the weekend, the CIF Federated Council moved to eliminate some wording in bylaws regarding “athletically motivated transfers.”

By a vote of 100-38 on Friday, the council tossed out certain language that allowed sections to declare athletes ineligible due to evidence they transferred to acquire athletic participation.

Athletes still can’t follow a coach to a new school and recruiting remains out of bounds. But, for instance, a player won’t be ruled ineligible simply because they transferred due to dissatisfaction with a coach at their former school.

Nor can the player be ruled ineligible simply because he or she transferred to assure varsity participation or playing time at their new school.

The same is true for a transfer to a school that is, objectively or subjectively, “more competitive or athletically visible.”

However, the move still can’t be made when prompted by association with club programs or outside agencies that use the facilities of the new school, or when evidence exists that multiple students have transferred or changed schools to participate in a particular sports program at one school.

Athletes who transfer without a valid change of address are still subject to sit-out periods.

The Southern Section Council moved to support the changes last week by a vote of 63-12-1.

Competitive cheer

The CIF Federated Council voted 138-0 on Friday to classify completive cheer as an approved interscholastic sport. Competitive cheer will be spring sport, but it’s unclear if it will make its way to the William S. Hart Union High School District.

Hart district Director of Human Resources and Equity Services Greg Lee said via text Monday that, “when polled, our schools were not leaning toward doing it. This does not change current cheer activities in support of other sports or the cheer competitions that they already attend.”

Competitive cheer will be governed by the National Federation of  State High School Associations Spirit Rules Book.

The Federated Council also voted on a proposal to standardize the number of contests in sports that culminate in a regional or state championship (it passed 119-19).

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CIF strikes some wording in bylaws regarding athletically motivated transfers

At its meeting in Ontario over the weekend, the CIF Federated Council moved to eliminate some wording in bylaws regarding “athletically motivated transfers.”

By a vote of 100-38 on Friday, the council tossed out certain language that allowed sections to declare athletes ineligible due to evidence they transferred to acquire athletic participation.

Athletes still can’t follow a coach to a new school and recruiting remains out of bounds. But, for instance, a player won’t be ruled ineligible simply because they transferred due to dissatisfaction with a coach at their former school.

Nor can the player be ruled ineligible simply because he or she transferred to assure varsity participation or playing time at their new school.

The same is true for a transfer to a school that is, objectively or subjectively, “more competitive or athletically visible.”

However, the move still can’t be made when prompted by association with club programs or outside agencies that use the facilities of the new school, or when evidence exists that multiple students have transferred or changed schools to participate in a particular sports program at one school.

Athletes who transfer without a valid change of address are still subject to sit-out periods.

The Southern Section Council moved to support the changes last week by a vote of 63-12-1.

Competitive cheer

The CIF Federated Council voted 138-0 on Friday to classify completive cheer as an approved interscholastic sport. Competitive cheer will be spring sport, but it’s unclear if it will make its way to the William S. Hart Union High School District.

Hart district Director of Human Resources and Equity Services Greg Lee said via text Monday that, “when polled, our schools were not leaning toward doing it. This does not change current cheer activities in support of other sports or the cheer competitions that they already attend.”

Competitive cheer will be governed by the National Federation of  State High School Associations Spirit Rules Book.

The Federated Council also voted on a proposal to standardize the number of contests in sports that culminate in a regional or state championship (it passed 119-19).

Mason Nesbitt

Mason Nesbitt

Mason Nesbitt is The Santa Clarita Valley Signal's Sports Editor.