Canine Culture: A Dog’s Life
Danielle Austin and Edwin Padilla wait outside of the Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar as young Nina stops to say hello to their dog Mack. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal
By Christian Monterrosa
Sunday, July 30th, 2017

At home, the company of a dog can make all the difference. But taking your furry friend beyond the boundaries of your backyard can be rough. Pun intended.

In Santa Clarita, there is a thriving culture of dog owners who find it refreshingly easy to find things to do with their pets outside of their homes.

Ziggy (above), and Maverick (below), play together at the Central Park dog park on Sunday. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

“Anywhere where there is outside seating, they’re pretty good about letting your dog in,” said Marco Marenghi, who was spending time with his chocolate labrador, Ziggy, at the Central Park dog park. Marco and his wife Joe rescued Ziggy from poor living conditions, demanding that the previous owner surrender him to them.

Merenghi also pointed out that the dog park could use some maintenance.

“It would be nice if there was grass in here. I know it’s difficult with dogs, but it doesn’t get watered so no grass grows so it’s very harsh on the dogs paws.”

A dog gets dried off after getting washed at U-Wash Doggie, a pet grooming service. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

After a day of play, Ziggy, along with many other dogs in Santa Clarita,  go to a local pet groomer that gives owners their own shower kit, complete with towel and dog treat, to bath their dogs.

Owner of U-Wash Doggie, Andres Gamero, has seen all types of owners and dogs walk in looking to give their pets the best grooming. “From young people to older people, everyone loves coming in and washing their own dog or dropping their dog off,” he said.

Owner of U-Wash Doggie, Andres Gamero, has been working with dogs since his father started the business 26 years ago. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

Gamero’s passion for animals inspired him to take over his father’s business. “There’s nothing better in life than waking up in the morning and know that you’re going to go and work with a bunch of animals.” said Gamero.

With so many options for dogs, Danielle Austin and Edwin Padilla often drive from the San Fernando Valley, where they live, just so that their Italian Mastiff, Mack, can accompany them. The recently engaged couple waited for their table at Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar, to order Mack some chicken and brown rice. The pet-friendly restaurant has a patio for dogs and their owners to dine together complete with a designated pooch menu.

Danielle Austin and Edwin Padilla wait outside of the Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar as young Nina stops to say hello to their dog Mack. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

“We bring him out to socialize him so that we feel comfortable when people come to our house.” said Padilla.

For some, owning a dog is having a friend to come home to. In Santa Clarita, it’s a lifestyle.

 

About the author

Christian Monterrosa

Christian Monterrosa

Danielle Austin and Edwin Padilla wait outside of the Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar as young Nina stops to say hello to their dog Mack. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

Canine Culture: A Dog’s Life

At home, the company of a dog can make all the difference. But taking your furry friend beyond the boundaries of your backyard can be rough. Pun intended.

In Santa Clarita, there is a thriving culture of dog owners who find it refreshingly easy to find things to do with their pets outside of their homes.

Ziggy (above), and Maverick (below), play together at the Central Park dog park on Sunday. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

“Anywhere where there is outside seating, they’re pretty good about letting your dog in,” said Marco Marenghi, who was spending time with his chocolate labrador, Ziggy, at the Central Park dog park. Marco and his wife Joe rescued Ziggy from poor living conditions, demanding that the previous owner surrender him to them.

Merenghi also pointed out that the dog park could use some maintenance.

“It would be nice if there was grass in here. I know it’s difficult with dogs, but it doesn’t get watered so no grass grows so it’s very harsh on the dogs paws.”

A dog gets dried off after getting washed at U-Wash Doggie, a pet grooming service. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

After a day of play, Ziggy, along with many other dogs in Santa Clarita,  go to a local pet groomer that gives owners their own shower kit, complete with towel and dog treat, to bath their dogs.

Owner of U-Wash Doggie, Andres Gamero, has seen all types of owners and dogs walk in looking to give their pets the best grooming. “From young people to older people, everyone loves coming in and washing their own dog or dropping their dog off,” he said.

Owner of U-Wash Doggie, Andres Gamero, has been working with dogs since his father started the business 26 years ago. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

Gamero’s passion for animals inspired him to take over his father’s business. “There’s nothing better in life than waking up in the morning and know that you’re going to go and work with a bunch of animals.” said Gamero.

With so many options for dogs, Danielle Austin and Edwin Padilla often drive from the San Fernando Valley, where they live, just so that their Italian Mastiff, Mack, can accompany them. The recently engaged couple waited for their table at Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar, to order Mack some chicken and brown rice. The pet-friendly restaurant has a patio for dogs and their owners to dine together complete with a designated pooch menu.

Danielle Austin and Edwin Padilla wait outside of the Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar as young Nina stops to say hello to their dog Mack. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

“We bring him out to socialize him so that we feel comfortable when people come to our house.” said Padilla.

For some, owning a dog is having a friend to come home to. In Santa Clarita, it’s a lifestyle.