Plan for 540 homes extended another year
By Jim Holt
Thursday, September 7th, 2017

 

The plan to build more than 500 homes between the eastern edge of the Santa Clarita Valley and Agua Dulce and was extended by regional planners Tuesday for one more year.

On Tuesday, members of Los Angeles County’s Department of Regional Planning approved a request made by the developer to have the project extended for at least one year.

The decision marks the second consecutive year that the plan to build west of Agua Dulce has been kept alive. A year ago, the person who applied for the extension – Susan Chivaratanond – was granted a one year extension.

Chivaratanond, who works for Los Angeles law firm of Mayer Brown LLP and is a former planner for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, made her request for an extension of the proposed development in front of the regional planning department Tuesday.

The approval Tuesday gives a green light to transform rural undeveloped land into subdivisions.

It calls for changes made to the Los Angeles Countywide General Plan converting land deemed “non-urban” to “low density residential” and changes to SCV’s Area Plan converting “non-urban” to “urban.”

Zoning changes are also in the works for “heavy agricultural” land to become “single-family residence.”

“The one year time extension was approved by the Hearing Officer yesterday,” Mitch Glaser, spokesman for the Regional Planning Department, told The Signal Wednesday.

The planned housing development sits north of Highway 14 and Soledad Canyon Road, between Shadow Pines Boulevard and Agua Dulce Canyon Road.

It will mean 542 homes built, one Los Angeles County Fire Department station and one Los Angeles County Sheriff Department substation, two parking lots and three “open space lots,” all on nearly 550 acres.

It will mean grading a hilly terrain in compliance with “hillside management design criteria,” according to the documents reviewed Tuesday by regional planners.

Four oak trees will be cut down if the plan goes through.

The one-year time extension for the project is good until Aug. 3, 2018.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

on Twitter @jamesarthurholt

About the author

Jim Holt

Jim Holt

Plan for 540 homes extended another year

 

The plan to build more than 500 homes between the eastern edge of the Santa Clarita Valley and Agua Dulce and was extended by regional planners Tuesday for one more year.

On Tuesday, members of Los Angeles County’s Department of Regional Planning approved a request made by the developer to have the project extended for at least one year.

The decision marks the second consecutive year that the plan to build west of Agua Dulce has been kept alive. A year ago, the person who applied for the extension – Susan Chivaratanond – was granted a one year extension.

Chivaratanond, who works for Los Angeles law firm of Mayer Brown LLP and is a former planner for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, made her request for an extension of the proposed development in front of the regional planning department Tuesday.

The approval Tuesday gives a green light to transform rural undeveloped land into subdivisions.

It calls for changes made to the Los Angeles Countywide General Plan converting land deemed “non-urban” to “low density residential” and changes to SCV’s Area Plan converting “non-urban” to “urban.”

Zoning changes are also in the works for “heavy agricultural” land to become “single-family residence.”

“The one year time extension was approved by the Hearing Officer yesterday,” Mitch Glaser, spokesman for the Regional Planning Department, told The Signal Wednesday.

The planned housing development sits north of Highway 14 and Soledad Canyon Road, between Shadow Pines Boulevard and Agua Dulce Canyon Road.

It will mean 542 homes built, one Los Angeles County Fire Department station and one Los Angeles County Sheriff Department substation, two parking lots and three “open space lots,” all on nearly 550 acres.

It will mean grading a hilly terrain in compliance with “hillside management design criteria,” according to the documents reviewed Tuesday by regional planners.

Four oak trees will be cut down if the plan goes through.

The one-year time extension for the project is good until Aug. 3, 2018.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

on Twitter @jamesarthurholt