Congressional caucus to bring awareness to NASA

By Gina Ender

Last update: Thursday, October 12th, 2017

The House of Representatives launched their NASA Caucus on Wednesday to create awareness of the administration’s impact on national security, the economy and technology.

Spearheaded by Representatives Steve Knight (R-Palmdale) and Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio), the caucus is comprised of 26 founding members to bring NASA’s programs representation in D.C.

“Many of these programs are critical to U.S. national interests, and there is an interest here to learn more and support them, but the current landscape does not yet support that level of interest,” Knight said in a statement. “I hope this caucus can stimulate that spark of hope and imagination and get us to inquire more about what NASA can offer to nation.”

With the caucus, Knight said he hopes to bring timely updates to Congress about NASA to make the United States more competitive in air and space development, exploration and research.

The announcement of the caucus was made on the anniversary of the launch of Pioneer I in 1958, NASA’s first spacecraft. Last week marked the 50th anniversary of Knight’s father’s supersonic flight record and this week marks the anniversary of the first flight to break the sound barrier, Knight’s office cited.

“NASA’s storied history has led America to discovery and innovation unparalleled in history,” Kaptur said in a statement. “NASA programs have fueled jobs, created new industries and inspired entire generations of Americans.”

The caucus will hold an official event to celebrate their establishment in December.

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Congressional caucus to bring awareness to NASA

Illustration of the coming solar eclipse on the NASA website.

The House of Representatives launched their NASA Caucus on Wednesday to create awareness of the administration’s impact on national security, the economy and technology.

Spearheaded by Representatives Steve Knight (R-Palmdale) and Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio), the caucus is comprised of 26 founding members to bring NASA’s programs representation in D.C.

“Many of these programs are critical to U.S. national interests, and there is an interest here to learn more and support them, but the current landscape does not yet support that level of interest,” Knight said in a statement. “I hope this caucus can stimulate that spark of hope and imagination and get us to inquire more about what NASA can offer to nation.”

With the caucus, Knight said he hopes to bring timely updates to Congress about NASA to make the United States more competitive in air and space development, exploration and research.

The announcement of the caucus was made on the anniversary of the launch of Pioneer I in 1958, NASA’s first spacecraft. Last week marked the 50th anniversary of Knight’s father’s supersonic flight record and this week marks the anniversary of the first flight to break the sound barrier, Knight’s office cited.

“NASA’s storied history has led America to discovery and innovation unparalleled in history,” Kaptur said in a statement. “NASA programs have fueled jobs, created new industries and inspired entire generations of Americans.”

The caucus will hold an official event to celebrate their establishment in December.

About the author

Gina Ender

Gina Ender

Gina Ender is a journalist covering city government and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in February 2017. You can contact Gina Ender at gender@signalscv.com, 661-287-5525 or follow her on Twitter at @ginaender.