TMU looks to break ‘barriers’ by lowering tuition

A group of students from Master's University leaves the Santa Clarita Community Center in Newhall after talking with their staff during the Newhall Discovery Day on Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017. Nikolas Samuels/The Signal
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The rising cost of college tuition has increasingly been a “barrier” to higher education, especially in California, but The Master’s University leadership voted to make things a little easier recently.

Going against the rising trend, TMU’s governing board voted to reduce tuition for the 2018-19 year by approximately $9,000, a 20 percent reduction, in an announcement made to students Friday .

“It ties directly into the mission of TMU, which has always been the advancement of the kingdom of God,” said Kory Welch, chief brand and public relations officer. “It’s the desire of our board to open up the doors and allow even more young people to receive the training and care that our young people provide.

“I think this just speaks directly to our desire to see our young people trained, and we felt that the price was a large barrier.”

With a downswing in grant aids, tuition and fees have consistently risen since the 2011-12 year, according to Collegeboard.org. The average published tuition price has increased on an average of $755 per year since 2011, starting at $30,210 and growing to $34,740 by 2017.

However, TMU’s students will now be facing a $24,950 yearly price tag as opposed to $33,000, a decision made in hopes of making the school more appealing to students and result in higher enrollment.

Welch pointed out that the university had the “greatest opportunity for students” in mind when they made the decision to lower tuition. He highlighted new programs at the school, like geology and marketing, that the board wants to make as accessible as possible and to remain a top choice for students.

Welch and the rest of the college’s staff are ready to reap the benefits of a lower tuition starting next fall.

“We’re prepared for a massive influx,” said Welch. “There’s definitely been a renewed excitement.”

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