Rain prompts county to warn residents about ocean water
Signal file photo Dan Watson A no swimming sign is posted at the empty swimming beach of the lower lagoon at Castaic Lake Recration Area in Castaic on Wednesday. 042915
By Perry Smith
Thursday, March 15th, 2018

Because of the recent rainfall, the county’s Interim Health Officer, Dr. Jeffrey Gunzenhauser, is cautioning residents who are planning to visit Los Angeles County beaches to be careful of swimming, surfing and playing in ocean waters around discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers.

Bacteria, debris, trash, and other public health hazards from city streets and mountain areas are likely to enter ocean waters though these outlets.

Discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers only comprise a small portion of the beach; therefore, anybody who wants to go to the beach will still be able to enjoy their outing. Swimmers and surfers are advised to stay away from discharge sites.

There is the possibility bacterium or chemicals from debris and trash could contaminate the water near and around discharge sites, and individuals who enter the water in these areas could become ill.

Areas of the beach apart from discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers are exempted from this advisory. This advisory will be in effect until at least Sunday, March 18 at 7:00 a.m. This advisory may be extended depending on further rainfall.

Recorded information on beach conditions is available 24 hours a day on the County’s beach closure hotline: 1-800-525-5662. Information is also available online at: PublicHealth.LACounty.gov/Beach/

The Department of Public Health is committed to protecting and improving the health of over 10 million residents of Los Angeles County.

Through a variety of programs, community partnerships and services, Public Health oversees environmental health, disease control, and community and family health.

Nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health comprises nearly 4,100 employees and has an annual budget of $1 billion. To learn more about the LA County Department of Public Health and the work they do, visit PublicHealth.LACounty.gov, and follow Public Health on social media at twitter.com/LAPublicHealth, facebook.com/LAPublicHealth, and youtube.com/LAPublicHealth.

The above information was provided to The Signal via a news release from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

 

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Perry Smith

Perry Smith

Signal file photo Dan Watson A no swimming sign is posted at the empty swimming beach of the lower lagoon at Castaic Lake Recration Area in Castaic on Wednesday. 042915

Rain prompts county to warn residents about ocean water

Because of the recent rainfall, the county’s Interim Health Officer, Dr. Jeffrey Gunzenhauser, is cautioning residents who are planning to visit Los Angeles County beaches to be careful of swimming, surfing and playing in ocean waters around discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers.

Bacteria, debris, trash, and other public health hazards from city streets and mountain areas are likely to enter ocean waters though these outlets.

Discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers only comprise a small portion of the beach; therefore, anybody who wants to go to the beach will still be able to enjoy their outing. Swimmers and surfers are advised to stay away from discharge sites.

There is the possibility bacterium or chemicals from debris and trash could contaminate the water near and around discharge sites, and individuals who enter the water in these areas could become ill.

Areas of the beach apart from discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers are exempted from this advisory. This advisory will be in effect until at least Sunday, March 18 at 7:00 a.m. This advisory may be extended depending on further rainfall.

Recorded information on beach conditions is available 24 hours a day on the County’s beach closure hotline: 1-800-525-5662. Information is also available online at: PublicHealth.LACounty.gov/Beach/

The Department of Public Health is committed to protecting and improving the health of over 10 million residents of Los Angeles County.

Through a variety of programs, community partnerships and services, Public Health oversees environmental health, disease control, and community and family health.

Nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health comprises nearly 4,100 employees and has an annual budget of $1 billion. To learn more about the LA County Department of Public Health and the work they do, visit PublicHealth.LACounty.gov, and follow Public Health on social media at twitter.com/LAPublicHealth, facebook.com/LAPublicHealth, and youtube.com/LAPublicHealth.

The above information was provided to The Signal via a news release from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.