CIF-Southern Section sends schools questionnaire regarding transfers
By Haley Sawyer
Friday, August 3rd, 2018

On Tuesday, the CIF-Southern Section issued a survey to all of its member schools that included just five questions.

The survey seems simple, but the topic it addresses is much more complex. The questions are part of the CIF-SS’s recent attempt to start a discussion surrounding transfers.

Rob Wigod, CIF-SS commissioner, issued a press release in late May asking if the section’s current transfer rules should be revised.

Over a month later, the survey came.

In my Message from the Commissioner in May 2018, I asked the question, “Is it time for us to have a conversation about transfer rules?” Based on the feedback I received from principals, athletic directors and coaches thus far, the answer has been a resounding Yes,” Wigod said in a note at the start of the survey.

The first question has a yes/no response and asks if the current transfer rules should be adjusted. Following that are three options that the school is asked to rank in order of preference.

Limited eligibility for one year from the date of transfer, a sit-out period for the second half of the season (including playoffs) and unlimited eligibility for freshman transfers.

According to the CIF-SS website, which publically publishes transfers on a monthly basis, the Foothill League currently has 13 transfers for the 2018-19 season.

Five transfers have been submitted by Valencia, followed by Golden Valley with three. Saugus and Hart each have two, while West Ranch has one and Canyon has none.

The website also lists the status of the transfer, which is under review, valid change of residence or sit out period, in accordance with CIF-SS regulations. For example, one Foothill League student-athlete is eligible for football on Sept. 25 and for baseball on March 19.

Those descriptions could look a lot different if the CIF-SS follows the example of multiple sports governing bodies across the country.

The Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA) passed a new rule stating that student-athletes who transfer during or after their 10th-grade year cannot take part in postseason games for one year in his or her respective sport.

Nearby, the Ohio High School Athletic Association enacted a rule that transfers are required to sit out the second half of the season, including playoffs, if they do not meet certain requirements.

In the Michigan High School Athletic Association, transfers now have to sit out an entire year. The Colorado High School Activities Association dictates that without a hardship waiver or bonafide move by the family, a transfer will be out 365 days.

The CIF-SS transfer survey is open until Sept. 7 and while there have been no rule changes made yet, a conversation on transfers has certainly begun on a higher level than the sidelines.

About the author

Haley Sawyer

Haley Sawyer

A Pennsylvania native, Haley Sawyer has covered sports across the country. She is a graduate of Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh and is the sports editor at The Signal.

CIF-Southern Section sends schools questionnaire regarding transfers

On Tuesday, the CIF-Southern Section issued a survey to all of its member schools that included just five questions.

The survey seems simple, but the topic it addresses is much more complex. The questions are part of the CIF-SS’s recent attempt to start a discussion surrounding transfers.

Rob Wigod, CIF-SS commissioner, issued a press release in late May asking if the section’s current transfer rules should be revised.

Over a month later, the survey came.

In my Message from the Commissioner in May 2018, I asked the question, “Is it time for us to have a conversation about transfer rules?” Based on the feedback I received from principals, athletic directors and coaches thus far, the answer has been a resounding Yes,” Wigod said in a note at the start of the survey.

The first question has a yes/no response and asks if the current transfer rules should be adjusted. Following that are three options that the school is asked to rank in order of preference.

Limited eligibility for one year from the date of transfer, a sit-out period for the second half of the season (including playoffs) and unlimited eligibility for freshman transfers.

According to the CIF-SS website, which publically publishes transfers on a monthly basis, the Foothill League currently has 13 transfers for the 2018-19 season.

Five transfers have been submitted by Valencia, followed by Golden Valley with three. Saugus and Hart each have two, while West Ranch has one and Canyon has none.

The website also lists the status of the transfer, which is under review, valid change of residence or sit out period, in accordance with CIF-SS regulations. For example, one Foothill League student-athlete is eligible for football on Sept. 25 and for baseball on March 19.

Those descriptions could look a lot different if the CIF-SS follows the example of multiple sports governing bodies across the country.

The Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA) passed a new rule stating that student-athletes who transfer during or after their 10th-grade year cannot take part in postseason games for one year in his or her respective sport.

Nearby, the Ohio High School Athletic Association enacted a rule that transfers are required to sit out the second half of the season, including playoffs, if they do not meet certain requirements.

In the Michigan High School Athletic Association, transfers now have to sit out an entire year. The Colorado High School Activities Association dictates that without a hardship waiver or bonafide move by the family, a transfer will be out 365 days.

The CIF-SS transfer survey is open until Sept. 7 and while there have been no rule changes made yet, a conversation on transfers has certainly begun on a higher level than the sidelines.

About the author

Haley Sawyer

Haley Sawyer

A Pennsylvania native, Haley Sawyer has covered sports across the country. She is a graduate of Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh and is the sports editor at The Signal.