More than 23,000 gallons lost in Castaic water main break
A Los Angeles County Public Works crew works to shut off a broken water main in Castaic Wednesday morning. Ryan Gilley/Two8Nine Media
By Jim Holt
Thursday, November 1st, 2018

More than 23,000 gallons of “clean” water went down the county drain Wednesday morning after a water main broke in Castaic.

At 8:20 a.m., firefighters with the Los Angeles County Fire Department responded to a section of Remington Road near Hasley Canyon Road for a water main break.

Officers with the California Highway Patrol also responding to the incident and notified workers with the Department of Public Works to bring road closure signs to the scene, CHP Officer Eric Priessman said.

Work crews had to repair asphalt damaged in the incident.

“Broken was an 8-inch cast iron pipe,” Public Works spokesman Steven Frasher said, describing the lost water as “clean” treated water.

“It (water main) has been in the ground since 1971. Eventually, over time, these pipes are going to break,” Frasher said, noting that different pipes will “wear out a different rates.”

Work crews repaired the broken pipe at 11:25 a.m., but not until 23,000 gallons was lost, Frasher said.

The amount of water released by the broken pipe is the same as half a football field under one foot of water.

The pipes are maintained by the Los Angeles County Waterworks District No. 36.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

On Twitter

@jamesarthurholt

 

About the author

Jim Holt

Jim Holt

A Los Angeles County Public Works crew works to shut off a broken water main in Castaic Wednesday morning. Ryan Gilley/Two8Nine Media

More than 23,000 gallons lost in Castaic water main break

More than 23,000 gallons of “clean” water went down the county drain Wednesday morning after a water main broke in Castaic.

At 8:20 a.m., firefighters with the Los Angeles County Fire Department responded to a section of Remington Road near Hasley Canyon Road for a water main break.

Officers with the California Highway Patrol also responding to the incident and notified workers with the Department of Public Works to bring road closure signs to the scene, CHP Officer Eric Priessman said.

Work crews had to repair asphalt damaged in the incident.

“Broken was an 8-inch cast iron pipe,” Public Works spokesman Steven Frasher said, describing the lost water as “clean” treated water.

“It (water main) has been in the ground since 1971. Eventually, over time, these pipes are going to break,” Frasher said, noting that different pipes will “wear out a different rates.”

Work crews repaired the broken pipe at 11:25 a.m., but not until 23,000 gallons was lost, Frasher said.

The amount of water released by the broken pipe is the same as half a football field under one foot of water.

The pipes are maintained by the Los Angeles County Waterworks District No. 36.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

On Twitter

@jamesarthurholt