Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital breaks ground on new patient tower
Thousands of blue streamers obscure the dignitaries as they lift shovels of dirt at the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital patient tower groundbreaking ceremony held at Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia on Wednesday. Dan Watson / The Signal
By Christina Cox
Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

After more than a decade in the making, Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital symbolically broke ground on its new patient portal Wednesday morning.

The $151 million patient tower, set to open in 2019, will add up to 142 patient beds to Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital to meet the growing needs of the Santa Clarita Valley community.

“For over 40 years, Henry Mayo has been on a journey to provide outstanding patient care for our community,” said Don Kimball, chairman of the Henry Mayo Board of Directors.  “This new tower will allow us to expand our healthcare services and provide an even better experience for our patients.”

The new six-level patient tower will include private rooms with bathrooms, medical/surgical rooms and a Women’s Services Unit.

“It will house 90 new private medical surgical rooms and 27 private rooms in our brand new women’s unit, for a total initial build-out of 117 new beds,” said Jonathan Miller, Henry Mayo’s vice president of facility planning and support operations.  “We’ve also planned for expansion capacity of an additional 30 surgical private rooms.”

The patient tower will also include an updated kitchen and cafe with indoor and outdoor dining areas and a permanent rooftop helipad for easier access to the emergency department for critical patients.

The project was designed with input from hospital staff and from those who support hospital staff, according to Dr. Larry Kidd, Henry Mayo’s senior vice president and chief clinical officer.

“We’re so excited at the prospect of this new tower allowing us to elevate our vision to the next level,” Dr. Kidd said.  “The goal is to provide a safe and comfortable environment for our patients and their loved ones.”

Roger Seaver, President and CEO of Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital speaks in front of a bull dozer at the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital patient tower groundbreaking ceremony held at Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia on Wednesday. Dan Watson / The Signal
Roger Seaver, President and CEO of Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital speaks in front of a bull dozer at the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital patient tower groundbreaking ceremony held at Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia on Wednesday. Dan Watson / The Signal

Roger Seaver, Henry Mayo’s president and chief executive officer, said that the building will care for approximately 10,000 per year or “hundreds of thousands” of people during its expected 50-year life.

“This is major investment in the infrastructure of this valley,” he said.  “So when we open the doors, it’s part of the perpetuity of this hospital and the permanent investment in this community.”

Mayor Bob Kellar credited Henry Mayo as one of the important aspects that makes Santa Clarita the city it is today.

“This hospital is a major building block to the success of this valley,” he said.  “This is why the city of Santa Clarita is truly is a 21st century city.”

ccox@signalscv.com
661-287-5575
On Twitter as @_ChristinaCox_

About the author

Christina Cox

Christina Cox

Christina Cox is a multimedia journalist covering education, community and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in August 2016.

Thousands of blue streamers obscure the dignitaries as they lift shovels of dirt at the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital patient tower groundbreaking ceremony held at Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia on Wednesday. Dan Watson / The Signal

Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital breaks ground on new patient tower

After more than a decade in the making, Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital symbolically broke ground on its new patient portal Wednesday morning.

The $151 million patient tower, set to open in 2019, will add up to 142 patient beds to Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital to meet the growing needs of the Santa Clarita Valley community.

“For over 40 years, Henry Mayo has been on a journey to provide outstanding patient care for our community,” said Don Kimball, chairman of the Henry Mayo Board of Directors.  “This new tower will allow us to expand our healthcare services and provide an even better experience for our patients.”

The new six-level patient tower will include private rooms with bathrooms, medical/surgical rooms and a Women’s Services Unit.

“It will house 90 new private medical surgical rooms and 27 private rooms in our brand new women’s unit, for a total initial build-out of 117 new beds,” said Jonathan Miller, Henry Mayo’s vice president of facility planning and support operations.  “We’ve also planned for expansion capacity of an additional 30 surgical private rooms.”

The patient tower will also include an updated kitchen and cafe with indoor and outdoor dining areas and a permanent rooftop helipad for easier access to the emergency department for critical patients.

The project was designed with input from hospital staff and from those who support hospital staff, according to Dr. Larry Kidd, Henry Mayo’s senior vice president and chief clinical officer.

“We’re so excited at the prospect of this new tower allowing us to elevate our vision to the next level,” Dr. Kidd said.  “The goal is to provide a safe and comfortable environment for our patients and their loved ones.”

Roger Seaver, President and CEO of Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital speaks in front of a bull dozer at the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital patient tower groundbreaking ceremony held at Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia on Wednesday. Dan Watson / The Signal
Roger Seaver, President and CEO of Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital speaks in front of a bull dozer at the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital patient tower groundbreaking ceremony held at Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia on Wednesday. Dan Watson / The Signal

Roger Seaver, Henry Mayo’s president and chief executive officer, said that the building will care for approximately 10,000 per year or “hundreds of thousands” of people during its expected 50-year life.

“This is major investment in the infrastructure of this valley,” he said.  “So when we open the doors, it’s part of the perpetuity of this hospital and the permanent investment in this community.”

Mayor Bob Kellar credited Henry Mayo as one of the important aspects that makes Santa Clarita the city it is today.

“This hospital is a major building block to the success of this valley,” he said.  “This is why the city of Santa Clarita is truly is a 21st century city.”

ccox@signalscv.com
661-287-5575
On Twitter as @_ChristinaCox_

About the author

Christina Cox

Christina Cox

Christina Cox is a multimedia journalist covering education, community and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in August 2016.