Vasquez Canyon Road likely to reopen in one week

By Jim Holt

Last update: Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

The buckling, bending, twisted stretch of Vasquez Canyon Road that captured nationwide interest because of its sudden earth-shifting transformation is likely to be reopened Nov. 23 with much fanfare.

The road was shut down a year ago – almost to the day – when “weird buckling” of the road made driving along it impossible.

“We’re talking about an official opening with the SD5 people,” Public Works spokesman Steve Frasher told The Signal Tuesday, referring to Supervisory District 5 which includes the Santa Clarita Valley.

When asked about reports of an official ribbon-cutting ceremony planned to mark the road’s reopening, Frasher said: “It’s being discussed right now.”
For months, officials with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works had been analyzing, strategizing and looking for ways to straighten the road when earlier this month the earth suddenly shifted again – only this time in a way favorable to implementing immediate road repairs.

Public Works officials had been pursuing paperwork needed to pursue eminent domain options in order to put shovels in the ground, fire up bulldozers and get the road repaired.

But, all that changed – for the better – when the earth moved again, in the right direction.

“So, instead of us going to the mountain, the mountain came to us,” Frasher said earlier this month.

“When the earth moved, we just kept scooping it up and taking it out of there,” he said.

 

jholt@signalscv.com
661-287-5527
on Twitter @jamesarthurholt

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Vasquez Canyon Road likely to reopen in one week

LA County Engineering Geologists climb on top of the buckled road where Vasquez Canyon Road has lifted up due to soil movement closing the road between Saugus and Canyon Country. Photo taken in November 2015 by Dan Watson, The Signal.

The buckling, bending, twisted stretch of Vasquez Canyon Road that captured nationwide interest because of its sudden earth-shifting transformation is likely to be reopened Nov. 23 with much fanfare.

The road was shut down a year ago – almost to the day – when “weird buckling” of the road made driving along it impossible.

“We’re talking about an official opening with the SD5 people,” Public Works spokesman Steve Frasher told The Signal Tuesday, referring to Supervisory District 5 which includes the Santa Clarita Valley.

When asked about reports of an official ribbon-cutting ceremony planned to mark the road’s reopening, Frasher said: “It’s being discussed right now.”
For months, officials with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works had been analyzing, strategizing and looking for ways to straighten the road when earlier this month the earth suddenly shifted again – only this time in a way favorable to implementing immediate road repairs.

Public Works officials had been pursuing paperwork needed to pursue eminent domain options in order to put shovels in the ground, fire up bulldozers and get the road repaired.

But, all that changed – for the better – when the earth moved again, in the right direction.

“So, instead of us going to the mountain, the mountain came to us,” Frasher said earlier this month.

“When the earth moved, we just kept scooping it up and taking it out of there,” he said.

 

jholt@signalscv.com
661-287-5527
on Twitter @jamesarthurholt

About the author

Jim Holt

Jim Holt

  • croberts

    Awesome news Jim. Thank you for the update.

  • wingman

    Does this seem almost laughable to anyone else. The county drags its feet forever, and then suddenly the earth shifts in their direction. Wouldn’t that mean the earth is still moving and I thought they said they could do nothing until the area stabilized. Now they can throw caution to the wind and crank up the machinery? And have a big ceremony to point out to everyone what an amazing job they have done? This smacks of politics of the worst kind. The self serving kind that the county seems to engage in far too often. It makes me wonder when they stopped being public servants and became road czars.