“Teary-eyed” vets hear from youngsters about Pearl Harbor

By Jim Holt

Last update: Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

The attack on Pearl Harbor began on Dec. 7, 1941, at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian time.

A surprise military strike, launched by the Imperial Japanese Navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, resulted in the death of 2,403 Americans and the wounding of 1,178 others.

It came in two waves, damaging eight American battleships, sinking four of them.

This month, two dozen servicemen who survived the attack returned to the scene of the battle, 10 of them going back for the first time since the Second World War, accompanied by Bill Reynolds, The Signal director of veterans affairs.

“They are appreciative, emotional and honored,” Reynolds said, describing the survivors’ mood Tuesday, the day for before the attack’s anniversary.

The survivors also visited the Navy Hale Keike School in Hawaii Tuesday and were moved – some to tears – meeting kids who knew of the attack they survived.

School kids at Navy Hale Keike School in Hawaii. photo by Bill Reynolds, The Signal.
School kids at Navy Hale Keike School in Hawaii. photo by Bill Reynolds, The Signal.“They were pleased that the youngsters are aware of their service and their sacrifices,” Reynolds said, describing the survivors as “teary-eyed, but happy.”

“They were pleased that the youngsters are aware of their service and their sacrifices,” Reynolds said, describing the survivors as “teary-eyed, but happy.”

Pearl Harbor survivor Pete Du Pre said: “These kids today have shown a great deal of knowledge of our history.  And, that’s how it ought to be across America.”

The journey was made possible by the non-profit group, the Greatest Generations Foundation. It is a nonprofit devoted to honoring America’s veterans, by sending them back to the battlefields on which they fought such as Germany and Italy.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

on Twitter @jamesarthurholt

The USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, photo by Rill Reynolds, The Signal.
The USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, photo by Rill Reynolds, The Signal.
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“Teary-eyed” vets hear from youngsters about Pearl Harbor

USS Missouri in Pearl Harbor. photo by Bill Reynolds, The Signal.

The attack on Pearl Harbor began on Dec. 7, 1941, at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian time.

A surprise military strike, launched by the Imperial Japanese Navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, resulted in the death of 2,403 Americans and the wounding of 1,178 others.

It came in two waves, damaging eight American battleships, sinking four of them.

This month, two dozen servicemen who survived the attack returned to the scene of the battle, 10 of them going back for the first time since the Second World War, accompanied by Bill Reynolds, The Signal director of veterans affairs.

“They are appreciative, emotional and honored,” Reynolds said, describing the survivors’ mood Tuesday, the day for before the attack’s anniversary.

The survivors also visited the Navy Hale Keike School in Hawaii Tuesday and were moved – some to tears – meeting kids who knew of the attack they survived.

School kids at Navy Hale Keike School in Hawaii. photo by Bill Reynolds, The Signal.
School kids at Navy Hale Keike School in Hawaii. photo by Bill Reynolds, The Signal.“They were pleased that the youngsters are aware of their service and their sacrifices,” Reynolds said, describing the survivors as “teary-eyed, but happy.”

“They were pleased that the youngsters are aware of their service and their sacrifices,” Reynolds said, describing the survivors as “teary-eyed, but happy.”

Pearl Harbor survivor Pete Du Pre said: “These kids today have shown a great deal of knowledge of our history.  And, that’s how it ought to be across America.”

The journey was made possible by the non-profit group, the Greatest Generations Foundation. It is a nonprofit devoted to honoring America’s veterans, by sending them back to the battlefields on which they fought such as Germany and Italy.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

on Twitter @jamesarthurholt

The USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, photo by Rill Reynolds, The Signal.
The USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, photo by Rill Reynolds, The Signal.

Jim Holt

Jim Holt