Club’s creative fundraiser aims to help community youth

By Samie Gebers

Last update: Sunday, March 12th, 2017

The clings of quarters hitting the bottom of metal buckets filled the air at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex on Saturday as the Canyon Country Optimist Club raised money to help community children and families.

The non-profit held various forms of auctions and ticket drawings to raise funds for projects like Safety Town Camp, a two-week period where preschoolers learn from educators how to live a safe life.

“Everything goes back to the youth of the Santa Clarita Valley,” said Norbert Moniz, the president of the Santa Clarita Optimist Foundation.

Last year, the 7th Annual Charity Quarter Auction raised about $45,000 to go towards fundraising youth-focused projects.

Ann Ochoa decides on which basket to dedicate her tickets to at the Canyon Country Optimist Club’s 7th Annual Charity Quarter Auction at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“We just do as much as we can to help an organization like this,” said event attendee Roni Mauldin. “It feels good.”

Mauldin has been attending the annual fundraiser for at least five years and attributes the consistency to the foundation’s hard work and helping children in the community such as foster youth.

“I’m a foster parent myself,” said Mauldin. “We just think it’s a wonderful organization and we want to help out.”

The quarter auction at the event are what attendees said kept them coming back every year.

Dianne Hardway, a volunteer and member of the Santa Clarita Optimist Foundation, sets up watches for the ticket drawing at the Canyon Country Optimist Club’s 7th Annual Charity Quarter Auction at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“We like to hear the sounds of the coins hitting the metal because it reminds us of Vegas when the slot machines actually paid off,” said Vivian Lawrence.

Lawrence retired from the education field and became a new member to the foundation to go back to her roots of helping children.

“It’s all about doing good for the community and being a better person yourself,” Lawrence said.

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Club’s creative fundraiser aims to help community youth

The Jennings Family "strategize" and review quarter auction items in the event brochure at the Canyon Country Optimist Club's 7th Annual Charity Quarter Auction held at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

The clings of quarters hitting the bottom of metal buckets filled the air at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex on Saturday as the Canyon Country Optimist Club raised money to help community children and families.

The non-profit held various forms of auctions and ticket drawings to raise funds for projects like Safety Town Camp, a two-week period where preschoolers learn from educators how to live a safe life.

“Everything goes back to the youth of the Santa Clarita Valley,” said Norbert Moniz, the president of the Santa Clarita Optimist Foundation.

Last year, the 7th Annual Charity Quarter Auction raised about $45,000 to go towards fundraising youth-focused projects.

Ann Ochoa decides on which basket to dedicate her tickets to at the Canyon Country Optimist Club’s 7th Annual Charity Quarter Auction at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“We just do as much as we can to help an organization like this,” said event attendee Roni Mauldin. “It feels good.”

Mauldin has been attending the annual fundraiser for at least five years and attributes the consistency to the foundation’s hard work and helping children in the community such as foster youth.

“I’m a foster parent myself,” said Mauldin. “We just think it’s a wonderful organization and we want to help out.”

The quarter auction at the event are what attendees said kept them coming back every year.

Dianne Hardway, a volunteer and member of the Santa Clarita Optimist Foundation, sets up watches for the ticket drawing at the Canyon Country Optimist Club’s 7th Annual Charity Quarter Auction at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“We like to hear the sounds of the coins hitting the metal because it reminds us of Vegas when the slot machines actually paid off,” said Vivian Lawrence.

Lawrence retired from the education field and became a new member to the foundation to go back to her roots of helping children.

“It’s all about doing good for the community and being a better person yourself,” Lawrence said.

About the author

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers is currently studying broadcast journalism at College of the Canyons. She reports on the weekends as well as produces video content during the week.

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers is currently studying broadcast journalism at College of the Canyons. She reports on the weekends as well as produces video content during the week.