Reenactors bring attendees back to the cowboy days
Kellen Ferreira, 11, and Chloe Ferreira 7, talk to historian August Simien about different kinds of saddles during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal
By Samie Gebers
Sunday, April 23rd, 2017

Dozens of reenactors and historians took time out of their weekend to take attendees of the Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival back in time to the Wild West.

“The cowboy is romantic, people love the cowboy,” said cattle drive reenactor Brad Richardson. “It represents our individuality. When they think of a cowboy, they think of an American.”

Richardson spent his Saturday night sleeping under the stars along with other volunteers, only to wake up the next day for another round at the festival and another day of teaching attendees about what it meant to be a cowboy.

Brad Richardson greets attendees at the cattle drive camp during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“People just love stories about cowboys, the outlaws, the good guys, bad guys, they love that time period,” he said.

Candace Castillo wore traditional Native American Apache wear and spent her weekend in front of the tepees, beading canes, making jewelry and giving everyone a glimpse into Apache life.

“You give them a peer into our daily culture,” Castillo said. “It’s important to teach kids history, because if you don’t know it, then you are deemed to repeat it.”

Five-year-old Brendan Suarez was excited to learn about everything cowboy, and was even more excited to meet the Lone Ranger.

Candace Castillo, an Apache Native American, beads a cane during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“I love cowboys and their guns,” he said. “They even have lassos too!”

Greg Mowry, who portrayed the Lone Ranger, admitted that one of his favorite parts were seeing the reactions of people who realized who he was.

“A television star still touches people’s heart strings 60 years later, that’s why I do this,” Mowry said. “I like making people happy.”

“He enjoys the reenactors very much,” Brendan Suarez’s father, Daniel Suarez said. “They show him the different cultures and the history behind everything.”

Brendan Suarez, 5, talks to the Lone Ranger portrayed by Greg Mowry during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

About the author

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers is currently studying broadcast journalism at College of the Canyons. She reports on the weekends as well as produces video content during the week.

Kellen Ferreira, 11, and Chloe Ferreira 7, talk to historian August Simien about different kinds of saddles during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

Reenactors bring attendees back to the cowboy days

Dozens of reenactors and historians took time out of their weekend to take attendees of the Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival back in time to the Wild West.

“The cowboy is romantic, people love the cowboy,” said cattle drive reenactor Brad Richardson. “It represents our individuality. When they think of a cowboy, they think of an American.”

Richardson spent his Saturday night sleeping under the stars along with other volunteers, only to wake up the next day for another round at the festival and another day of teaching attendees about what it meant to be a cowboy.

Brad Richardson greets attendees at the cattle drive camp during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“People just love stories about cowboys, the outlaws, the good guys, bad guys, they love that time period,” he said.

Candace Castillo wore traditional Native American Apache wear and spent her weekend in front of the tepees, beading canes, making jewelry and giving everyone a glimpse into Apache life.

“You give them a peer into our daily culture,” Castillo said. “It’s important to teach kids history, because if you don’t know it, then you are deemed to repeat it.”

Five-year-old Brendan Suarez was excited to learn about everything cowboy, and was even more excited to meet the Lone Ranger.

Candace Castillo, an Apache Native American, beads a cane during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“I love cowboys and their guns,” he said. “They even have lassos too!”

Greg Mowry, who portrayed the Lone Ranger, admitted that one of his favorite parts were seeing the reactions of people who realized who he was.

“A television star still touches people’s heart strings 60 years later, that’s why I do this,” Mowry said. “I like making people happy.”

“He enjoys the reenactors very much,” Brendan Suarez’s father, Daniel Suarez said. “They show him the different cultures and the history behind everything.”

Brendan Suarez, 5, talks to the Lone Ranger portrayed by Greg Mowry during the 24th annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park in Old Town Newhall on Sunday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

About the author

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers

Samie Gebers is currently studying broadcast journalism at College of the Canyons. She reports on the weekends as well as produces video content during the week.