Local club showcases importance of ham radio
Chris Edwards attempts to find other Field Day participants on his ham radio during the W6JW Santa Clarita Radio Club Field Day at the Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal
By Ryan Painter
Saturday, June 24th, 2017

It’s the last line of communication. That is why Steve Das has been interested in ham radio for years.

“When everything fails, the power grid goes down and you have an earthquake or a bad mudslide…cell phones are the first things that go away,” Das said.

The W6JW Santa Clarita Amateur Radio Club had their annual 24-hour Field Day at Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Club members opened up their event to the public to learn more about amatuer radio and its importance.

Chris Edwards attempts to find other Field Day participants on his ham radio during the W6JW Santa Clarita Radio Club Field Day at the Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“(The event) is a way for amateur radio operators to dial in their skills as far as (participating in) an emergency set up station,” said Field Day chair Chris Sheridan.

In addition to amateur radio as a means of emergency communication, Field Day is also an opportunity for enthusiasts to reach out to others across the country.

“It’s also a contest to make as many contacts as you can in a twenty-four hour period,” Sheridan said. “You can talk to people halfway around the world.”

Even in the wake of technological advances, residents find that ham radio still plays an important role in keeping the community safe.

Linda Buesching, a Valencia resident, recently had community emergency response team training. After her certification, she realized the crucial role radio can play in a critical situation.

”When the cellphones and landlines are down, they are all that are left,” Buesching said.

“If I can help the community in a disaster, if I can help a person whose car broke down in the middle of nowhere, why not?”

Samie Gebers also contributed to this report.

From left to right, Steve Ioerger, Tom Turner and Mike van Norman attempt to make contact with individuals through ham radio during the W6JW Santa Clarita Radio Club Field Day at the Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

About the author

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter joined The Signal as a staff writer in June 2017, covering breaking news and community features on the weekends. He graduated from West Ranch High School in 2016 and currently studies Political Science at USC.

Chris Edwards attempts to find other Field Day participants on his ham radio during the W6JW Santa Clarita Radio Club Field Day at the Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

Local club showcases importance of ham radio

It’s the last line of communication. That is why Steve Das has been interested in ham radio for years.

“When everything fails, the power grid goes down and you have an earthquake or a bad mudslide…cell phones are the first things that go away,” Das said.

The W6JW Santa Clarita Amateur Radio Club had their annual 24-hour Field Day at Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Club members opened up their event to the public to learn more about amatuer radio and its importance.

Chris Edwards attempts to find other Field Day participants on his ham radio during the W6JW Santa Clarita Radio Club Field Day at the Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

“(The event) is a way for amateur radio operators to dial in their skills as far as (participating in) an emergency set up station,” said Field Day chair Chris Sheridan.

In addition to amateur radio as a means of emergency communication, Field Day is also an opportunity for enthusiasts to reach out to others across the country.

“It’s also a contest to make as many contacts as you can in a twenty-four hour period,” Sheridan said. “You can talk to people halfway around the world.”

Even in the wake of technological advances, residents find that ham radio still plays an important role in keeping the community safe.

Linda Buesching, a Valencia resident, recently had community emergency response team training. After her certification, she realized the crucial role radio can play in a critical situation.

”When the cellphones and landlines are down, they are all that are left,” Buesching said.

“If I can help the community in a disaster, if I can help a person whose car broke down in the middle of nowhere, why not?”

Samie Gebers also contributed to this report.

From left to right, Steve Ioerger, Tom Turner and Mike van Norman attempt to make contact with individuals through ham radio during the W6JW Santa Clarita Radio Club Field Day at the Castaic Lake Water Agency on Saturday. Samie Gebers/The Signal

About the author

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter joined The Signal as a staff writer in June 2017, covering breaking news and community features on the weekends. He graduated from West Ranch High School in 2016 and currently studies Political Science at USC.