Despite trace amounts of rain in Saugus, fire danger persists
By Ryan Painter
Saturday, December 16th, 2017

Although Saugus received a small amount of rain on Friday night, weather officials say it will do little to curb the overall fire danger the Santa Clarita Valley is expected to face over the course of the weekend.

“We had a couple of sensors register trace amounts of rain last night,” said meteorologist Tom Fischer of the National Weather Service. “There was a narrow, short band ahead of the [low pressure] front with a very light drizzle.”

Sensors in Palmdale, Lancaster, Burbank and parts of the Inland Empire registered similar data.

Saugus received just enough rain to trigger the National Weather Service’s sensor, located near the softball fields at Central Park, but not enough to have any significant effect on fire danger.

“It’s like nothing even happened,” Fischer said.

Fischer explained that in order to mitigate the extreme fire danger, Santa Clarita would need enough rain to penetrate the soil and to be absorbed by the shrubs.

“You would need at least one or two inches of good soil moisture to have an effect,” he said.

 

About the author

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter joined The Signal as a staff writer in June 2017, covering breaking news and community features on the weekends. He graduated from West Ranch High School in 2016 and currently studies Political Science at USC.

Despite trace amounts of rain in Saugus, fire danger persists

Although Saugus received a small amount of rain on Friday night, weather officials say it will do little to curb the overall fire danger the Santa Clarita Valley is expected to face over the course of the weekend.

“We had a couple of sensors register trace amounts of rain last night,” said meteorologist Tom Fischer of the National Weather Service. “There was a narrow, short band ahead of the [low pressure] front with a very light drizzle.”

Sensors in Palmdale, Lancaster, Burbank and parts of the Inland Empire registered similar data.

Saugus received just enough rain to trigger the National Weather Service’s sensor, located near the softball fields at Central Park, but not enough to have any significant effect on fire danger.

“It’s like nothing even happened,” Fischer said.

Fischer explained that in order to mitigate the extreme fire danger, Santa Clarita would need enough rain to penetrate the soil and to be absorbed by the shrubs.

“You would need at least one or two inches of good soil moisture to have an effect,” he said.

 

About the author

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter

Ryan Painter joined The Signal as a staff writer in June 2017, covering breaking news and community features on the weekends. He graduated from West Ranch High School in 2016 and currently studies Political Science at USC.