Our View: Signal’s 100th year is a community event
By Signal Editorial Board
Saturday, February 10th, 2018

The Santa Clarita Valley is home to the Oak of the Golden Dream, which launched the California gold rush in 1842, according to legend. Then there was another boom, as our hills became dotted with the first commercial oil wells, remnants of which can still be seen in operation today.

Our valley was also a home of the Western and the biggest stars of the day for a time; and during roughly the same era, Val Verde was known as the “Black Palm Springs,” a cultural refuge during a time when our society was largely segregated.

Needless to say, the Santa Clarita Valley’s history is rich and colorful, and reflects the many different communities that have all played a role in shaping today’s SCV.

But for the last 99 years, there’s been one constant presence: The Signal.

The Signal’s first issue was published on Feb. 7, 1919, and it has published continuously since then. It has chronicled the incredible growth of the SCV from a small town to a relevant and powerful region where businesses want to be and people want to live. The Signal has been part of people’s lives for decades, taken for granted at times, but always the entity that members of the local community have turned to to get their local information.

Those of us who are privileged to be the current stewards of The Signal know how important it has been to the community and know how it has been one of the few stalwarts over the years in this ever-changing and growing place. That’s why as the publication moves into its 100th year, its influence in the community and on its people should be celebrated. Love it or hate it, The Signal has for a century been our community’s tireless reporter making sure the news, events and people here will never be forgotten.

That’s why in the next year as we ramp up to a big Signal 100th birthday celebration we would like people who have lived or worked in the SCV to share their memories of The Signal. Perhaps you were featured in the publication or perhaps there was a particular event or story that The Signal covered that was memorable or important to you. Tell us about it.

What is your favorite section of the publication? Maybe you have or had a favorite writer. Whatever it may be, we’d like to hear from readers so that we can make The Signal’s 100th year a special community event involving the community.

Contact us at 661-259-1234. Please share your Signal memories or thoughts on how The Signal has been a part of the Santa Clarita Valley for the last 100 years by emailing them to CityDesk@SignalSCV.com.

A celebration of The Signal’s 100th year is a celebration of 100 years of the SCV. It’s a time to remember our history, discuss our current issues and talk about where we go from here as a community.

Thank you to our loyal readers who have subscribed to The Signal for years. Thank you to our loyal advertisers who understand that a truly free press needs to make money on its own. Thank you to the former and current employees of The Signal who have worked tirelessly to bring the community local information over the years.

Thanks for reading.

About the author

Signal Editorial Board

Signal Editorial Board

Our View: Signal’s 100th year is a community event

The Santa Clarita Valley is home to the Oak of the Golden Dream, which launched the California gold rush in 1842, according to legend. Then there was another boom, as our hills became dotted with the first commercial oil wells, remnants of which can still be seen in operation today.

Our valley was also a home of the Western and the biggest stars of the day for a time; and during roughly the same era, Val Verde was known as the “Black Palm Springs,” a cultural refuge during a time when our society was largely segregated.

Needless to say, the Santa Clarita Valley’s history is rich and colorful, and reflects the many different communities that have all played a role in shaping today’s SCV.

But for the last 99 years, there’s been one constant presence: The Signal.

The Signal’s first issue was published on Feb. 7, 1919, and it has published continuously since then. It has chronicled the incredible growth of the SCV from a small town to a relevant and powerful region where businesses want to be and people want to live. The Signal has been part of people’s lives for decades, taken for granted at times, but always the entity that members of the local community have turned to to get their local information.

Those of us who are privileged to be the current stewards of The Signal know how important it has been to the community and know how it has been one of the few stalwarts over the years in this ever-changing and growing place. That’s why as the publication moves into its 100th year, its influence in the community and on its people should be celebrated. Love it or hate it, The Signal has for a century been our community’s tireless reporter making sure the news, events and people here will never be forgotten.

That’s why in the next year as we ramp up to a big Signal 100th birthday celebration we would like people who have lived or worked in the SCV to share their memories of The Signal. Perhaps you were featured in the publication or perhaps there was a particular event or story that The Signal covered that was memorable or important to you. Tell us about it.

What is your favorite section of the publication? Maybe you have or had a favorite writer. Whatever it may be, we’d like to hear from readers so that we can make The Signal’s 100th year a special community event involving the community.

Contact us at 661-259-1234. Please share your Signal memories or thoughts on how The Signal has been a part of the Santa Clarita Valley for the last 100 years by emailing them to CityDesk@SignalSCV.com.

A celebration of The Signal’s 100th year is a celebration of 100 years of the SCV. It’s a time to remember our history, discuss our current issues and talk about where we go from here as a community.

Thank you to our loyal readers who have subscribed to The Signal for years. Thank you to our loyal advertisers who understand that a truly free press needs to make money on its own. Thank you to the former and current employees of The Signal who have worked tirelessly to bring the community local information over the years.

Thanks for reading.