Train victim helped his mother, others
Nicole Childs and Jordan Smith
By Jim Holt
Monday, February 12th, 2018

The man who died after being struck by a train in Acton spent most of his time helping others, most notably quitting his job to look after his mother who suffers from Alzheimer’s, friends and family told The Signal.

Jordan Arthurlee Smith, 34, lived in Acton, and was surrounded by loving members of a large caring family.

News of his death has stunned those around him, including the deceased man’s brothers.

“He had to quit his job, to look after his mother,” said Dave Terrusa, the deceased man’s uncle, referring to a retail job.

Mitch Terrusa, Jordan’s father, told The Signal: “He had been doing well. Although he had bipolar disorder, friends say he was normal and happy as ever earlier in the day.”

“He was helping me, his father, take care of his mother who has dementia,” he said.

Jordan Smith died after he was struck by a train in Acton on Thursday night.

On the night he was killed, Palmdale Sheriff’s Station officials responded to a report of a pedestrian on the tracks being struck by a train, near where Arrastre Canyon Road intersects Crown Valley Road, in Acton.

Although he apparently struggled to help himself, those who knew him described him as selflessly and continually helping others.

“He was a wonderful person and left an impression on so many,” Christopher Hom told The Signal.

“He had a reputation for being the most loving, compassionate and warm person. I can guarantee you that at least 30 other people would say the same,” he said.

At least a dozen of the people who knew him, reached out to The Signal after his death to draw attention to the fact that he helped those around him.

“He was a son, brother and uncle and most of all a human being who was living with his parents and helping his dad take care of his mom, who has Alzheimer’s,” said JoAnn Heinzman.

Choosing to help his mother, “speaks volumes about him,” she said. “He turned into such a nice young man.

“He was making such great strides to turn his life around,” she told The Signal Monday.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

On Twitter @jamesarthurholt

 

About the author

Jim Holt

Jim Holt

Nicole Childs and Jordan Smith

Train victim helped his mother, others

The man who died after being struck by a train in Acton spent most of his time helping others, most notably quitting his job to look after his mother who suffers from Alzheimer’s, friends and family told The Signal.

Jordan Arthurlee Smith, 34, lived in Acton, and was surrounded by loving members of a large caring family.

News of his death has stunned those around him, including the deceased man’s brothers.

“He had to quit his job, to look after his mother,” said Dave Terrusa, the deceased man’s uncle, referring to a retail job.

Mitch Terrusa, Jordan’s father, told The Signal: “He had been doing well. Although he had bipolar disorder, friends say he was normal and happy as ever earlier in the day.”

“He was helping me, his father, take care of his mother who has dementia,” he said.

Jordan Smith died after he was struck by a train in Acton on Thursday night.

On the night he was killed, Palmdale Sheriff’s Station officials responded to a report of a pedestrian on the tracks being struck by a train, near where Arrastre Canyon Road intersects Crown Valley Road, in Acton.

Although he apparently struggled to help himself, those who knew him described him as selflessly and continually helping others.

“He was a wonderful person and left an impression on so many,” Christopher Hom told The Signal.

“He had a reputation for being the most loving, compassionate and warm person. I can guarantee you that at least 30 other people would say the same,” he said.

At least a dozen of the people who knew him, reached out to The Signal after his death to draw attention to the fact that he helped those around him.

“He was a son, brother and uncle and most of all a human being who was living with his parents and helping his dad take care of his mom, who has Alzheimer’s,” said JoAnn Heinzman.

Choosing to help his mother, “speaks volumes about him,” she said. “He turned into such a nice young man.

“He was making such great strides to turn his life around,” she told The Signal Monday.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

On Twitter @jamesarthurholt