Tribute to be held for historic Armenian battle at Eternal Valley
The replica of the Sardarabad monument looms at Eternal Valley Memorial Park/ Ryan Mancini The Signal
By Ryan Mancini
Sunday, May 20th, 2018

Eternal Valley Memorial Park will introduce the Garden of Sardarabad to its grounds on May 22, in remembrance of the 100th anniversary of a military victory in Armenia.

“This was actually a dream of mine for a long time,” said Market Sales Manager Arthur Keledjian. He added that he had developed an idea for the tribute three years ago in collaboration with Eternal Valley.

The commemoration remembers the Battle of Sardarabad, a major Armenian victory against the Turkish army on May 21-29, 1918. Keledjian said it was a major success in fighting off their enemies and defending Armenian culture and faith, preventing a greater tragedy from unfolding after the initial years of the Armenian Genocide.

Keledjian said the idea behind the tribute also serves as a recognition for the Armenian communities across southern California. He also said there is a possibility for descendents or relatives of those who fought at Sardarabad may show up at the tribute, but could not confirm.

The tribute will be a new addition to Eternal Valley and feature a 20-foot high replica of the monument which stands at the battle site in Armenia.

“It will be the only replica of the monument in the world,” said Keledjian. “One in Santa Clarita, and one in Armenia.”

At the event, the site will be blessed by Archbishop Hovnan Derderian, founder of the St. Sarkis Armenian Apostolic Church in Santa Clarita. The garden itself will be installed May 21, before the grand opening.

The event will be free to the public.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.

The replica of the Sardarabad monument looms at Eternal Valley Memorial Park/ Ryan Mancini The Signal

Tribute to be held for historic Armenian battle at Eternal Valley

Eternal Valley Memorial Park will introduce the Garden of Sardarabad to its grounds on May 22, in remembrance of the 100th anniversary of a military victory in Armenia.

“This was actually a dream of mine for a long time,” said Market Sales Manager Arthur Keledjian. He added that he had developed an idea for the tribute three years ago in collaboration with Eternal Valley.

The commemoration remembers the Battle of Sardarabad, a major Armenian victory against the Turkish army on May 21-29, 1918. Keledjian said it was a major success in fighting off their enemies and defending Armenian culture and faith, preventing a greater tragedy from unfolding after the initial years of the Armenian Genocide.

Keledjian said the idea behind the tribute also serves as a recognition for the Armenian communities across southern California. He also said there is a possibility for descendents or relatives of those who fought at Sardarabad may show up at the tribute, but could not confirm.

The tribute will be a new addition to Eternal Valley and feature a 20-foot high replica of the monument which stands at the battle site in Armenia.

“It will be the only replica of the monument in the world,” said Keledjian. “One in Santa Clarita, and one in Armenia.”

At the event, the site will be blessed by Archbishop Hovnan Derderian, founder of the St. Sarkis Armenian Apostolic Church in Santa Clarita. The garden itself will be installed May 21, before the grand opening.

The event will be free to the public.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.