VIDEO: Santa Clarita Valley residents: get ready to vote June 5
By Crystal Duan
Thursday, May 31st, 2018

California’s June 5 Primary election is fast-approaching, and while SCV residents can rely on whatever winds up in their mailbox for their decision, The Signal also took a look at a few of the options for voters.

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day next Tuesday.

This year, the issues on the ballot will be Proposition 68, Proposition 69, Proposition 70, Proposition 71 and Proposition 72.

Videos from College of the Canyons political science professor Phil Gussin take a look at five of the measures voters will be able to weigh in on next week.

Proposition 68

Prop. 68 authorizes $4 billion in bond funding for natural resources programs such as habitat conservation, parks and water-related projects. A vote yes would authorize the funding, while a vote no would prohibit it from moving forward.

Proposition 69


Prop. 69 requires certain new transportation revenues, such as fuel taxes and vehicle fees, to be used for only transportation purposes. A vote yes would enable this, while a vote no would mean the California State Legislature could change current law in the future to use the revenues from fuel taxes and vehicle fees for other purposes.

Proposition 70


Prop. 70 requires a legislative supermajority of ⅔ votes to use for revenues from selling state greenhouse gas emission permits. A vote yes would enable this, while a vote no would mean the legislature could authorize spending the revenue with simply a majority vote.

Proposition 71, 72


Prop. 71 sets a standard of certifying the state vote before a ballot measure takes effect. A vote yes would allow a measure to take effect about six weeks after Election Day after the state confirms the count, while a vote no would mean measures would automatically take effect the day after Election Day.

Prop. 72 permits the legislature to allow construction of rain-capture systems (starting from Jan. 1, 2019) without property-tax reassessment, which would lead to a minor reduction in property taxes. A vote yes would install such a system, and a vote no would result in a higher property tax bill.

The candidates for the 25th Congressional District are Congressman Steve Knight, R-Palmdale, and Democratic challengers Katie Hill, Bryan Caforio, Mary Pallant and Jess Phoenix.

The candidates for the 38th Assembly District are Assemblyman Dante Acosta, R-Santa Clarita, and Democratic challenger Christy Smith.

The candidates for the 36th Assembly District are Assemblyman Tom Lackey, R-Palmdale, and Democratic challenger Steve Fox.

Voters will also choose their picks for state governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, attorney general, treasurer, controller and insurance commissioner.

To check your polling center, SCV residents can use five ways:

If you moved to a new address after May 21, and did not re-register, you may vote at your former polling place or “conditionally register” and vote at your county elections office or vote center. Visit www.sos.ca.gov/elections/voter-registration/conditional-voter-reg.

About the author

Crystal Duan

Crystal Duan

Crystal Duan is the Signal's political reporter, covering City Council, the county and other happenings around the city. She graduated from the University of Missouri's journalism school and has worked at the Indianapolis Star and Minneapolis Star Tribune. She has been with the Signal since March 2018.

VIDEO: Santa Clarita Valley residents: get ready to vote June 5

California’s June 5 Primary election is fast-approaching, and while SCV residents can rely on whatever winds up in their mailbox for their decision, The Signal also took a look at a few of the options for voters.

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day next Tuesday.

This year, the issues on the ballot will be Proposition 68, Proposition 69, Proposition 70, Proposition 71 and Proposition 72.

Videos from College of the Canyons political science professor Phil Gussin take a look at five of the measures voters will be able to weigh in on next week.

Proposition 68

Prop. 68 authorizes $4 billion in bond funding for natural resources programs such as habitat conservation, parks and water-related projects. A vote yes would authorize the funding, while a vote no would prohibit it from moving forward.

Proposition 69


Prop. 69 requires certain new transportation revenues, such as fuel taxes and vehicle fees, to be used for only transportation purposes. A vote yes would enable this, while a vote no would mean the California State Legislature could change current law in the future to use the revenues from fuel taxes and vehicle fees for other purposes.

Proposition 70


Prop. 70 requires a legislative supermajority of ⅔ votes to use for revenues from selling state greenhouse gas emission permits. A vote yes would enable this, while a vote no would mean the legislature could authorize spending the revenue with simply a majority vote.

Proposition 71, 72


Prop. 71 sets a standard of certifying the state vote before a ballot measure takes effect. A vote yes would allow a measure to take effect about six weeks after Election Day after the state confirms the count, while a vote no would mean measures would automatically take effect the day after Election Day.

Prop. 72 permits the legislature to allow construction of rain-capture systems (starting from Jan. 1, 2019) without property-tax reassessment, which would lead to a minor reduction in property taxes. A vote yes would install such a system, and a vote no would result in a higher property tax bill.

The candidates for the 25th Congressional District are Congressman Steve Knight, R-Palmdale, and Democratic challengers Katie Hill, Bryan Caforio, Mary Pallant and Jess Phoenix.

The candidates for the 38th Assembly District are Assemblyman Dante Acosta, R-Santa Clarita, and Democratic challenger Christy Smith.

The candidates for the 36th Assembly District are Assemblyman Tom Lackey, R-Palmdale, and Democratic challenger Steve Fox.

Voters will also choose their picks for state governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, attorney general, treasurer, controller and insurance commissioner.

To check your polling center, SCV residents can use five ways:

  • Call 800-345-VOTE
  • Go online at www.sos.ca.gov/elections/polling-place or voterstatus.sos.ca.gov
  • Text Vote to GOVOTE
  • On the Vote California mobile app, available at the iOS or Android store

If you moved to a new address after May 21, and did not re-register, you may vote at your former polling place or “conditionally register” and vote at your county elections office or vote center. Visit www.sos.ca.gov/elections/voter-registration/conditional-voter-reg.

About the author

Crystal Duan

Crystal Duan

Crystal Duan is the Signal's political reporter, covering City Council, the county and other happenings around the city. She graduated from the University of Missouri's journalism school and has worked at the Indianapolis Star and Minneapolis Star Tribune. She has been with the Signal since March 2018.