Robert Lamoureux: Sunscreens give huge savings
By Robert Lamoureux
Saturday, July 7th, 2018

Question No. 1

Robert,

You did an article about a year ago regarding window screens in the home that block out sun/heat.

At the time, we were unable to do anything like that, but now that the summer’s here, and I can think about such an upgrade, I’m unable to find the article so am hoping that you will revisit this subject so I can know exactly what to look for.

I do remember you saying that it is in lieu of putting tint up and that it really helps for the summer time but that can be removed in the winter. I have many windows on the south side of our home and the air conditioner can barely keep up with the heat.

Shyhe

Answer No. 1

Shyhe,

They are sunscreens, and to my knowledge, there is only one guy here in town that does them.

I can give you the information separately, but it would be a great choice for you to do this at your home. They cut out about 85 percent of the heat that comes through those windows, a huge savings to your electric bill. Definitely an investment when you first get them, but care well for them, store them to protect them for winter and then you’ll get many years out of them.

The contractor will build a frame and these will be installed on both the active side and the stationary side of your window, and will prevent much heat. They can also be installed on skylights, which also really helps. I’ve done this on my own home and with good care, over eight years later, I still have them and swear by them.

They come in an array of colors so any home can be fit for aesthetics. You could go with the tint also, they even now have a transparent tint that is equally effective at preventing that heat from coming in. Either of these choices are great options, and you’ll see a significant drop in electric charges when you compare the previous year.

Good luck,

Robert

Question No. 2

I’m part of an HOA board that doesn’t have a whole lot of money, but we have an issue at the carport area, (illustrated separately in pictures).

The fascia board on the carport has been removed, and then there’s another fascia board behind it, about 40 percent of which is also rotted through. The board is saying to leave the fascia (about 40 percent of which is rotted) that is behind the removed fascia, there and just nail on the new fascia to this.

I say, “No way” — fix it all after we first find out why it rotted and fix that, then replace it all. I’m not the expert, but I do need an expert opinion on what we should do, as we’ve been mismanaged for a long time and now it’s just us doing our best managing our property on our own.

Please help,

Darrin G.

Answer No. 2

Darrin, the second board is called a “Rim Board,” and that’s what ties all of the roof joists on the carports together.

This is part of the structural integrity of the carport and if they are rotted/rotting and they aren’t replaced, you’ll be looking over time, at a collapsing roof due to rot… a huge liability.

In the pictures, I see at least 6 that aren’t even tied in at this time due to rot, and the problem is just beginning.

This all needs to be cut out and replaced, as well as a new fascia. I can also see that your drip edge is missing.

This is a flashing detail that goes under the roofing membrane and deflects the water away from the fascia. You’ve got work to do here but if you put the flashing on, replace the needed wood and be sure to prime ALL sides of the rim block and fascia (sounds like overkill but it will help), and maintain the roof by doing maintenance, you will prevent the unnecessary failure of this structure.

Good luck to you and your board, your job isn’t easy.

Robert

Robert Lamoureux has 38 years of experience as a general contractor, with separate licenses in electrical and plumbing contracting. He owns IMS Construction Inc. in Valencia. His opinions are his own, not necessarily those of The Signal. Opinions expressed in this column are not meant to replace the recommendations of a qualified contractor after that contractor has made a thorough visual inspection. Email questions to Robert at robert@imsconstruction.com.

About the author

Robert Lamoureux

Robert Lamoureux

Robert Lamoureux: Sunscreens give huge savings

Question No. 1

Robert,

You did an article about a year ago regarding window screens in the home that block out sun/heat.

At the time, we were unable to do anything like that, but now that the summer’s here, and I can think about such an upgrade, I’m unable to find the article so am hoping that you will revisit this subject so I can know exactly what to look for.

I do remember you saying that it is in lieu of putting tint up and that it really helps for the summer time but that can be removed in the winter. I have many windows on the south side of our home and the air conditioner can barely keep up with the heat.

Shyhe

Answer No. 1

Shyhe,

They are sunscreens, and to my knowledge, there is only one guy here in town that does them.

I can give you the information separately, but it would be a great choice for you to do this at your home. They cut out about 85 percent of the heat that comes through those windows, a huge savings to your electric bill. Definitely an investment when you first get them, but care well for them, store them to protect them for winter and then you’ll get many years out of them.

The contractor will build a frame and these will be installed on both the active side and the stationary side of your window, and will prevent much heat. They can also be installed on skylights, which also really helps. I’ve done this on my own home and with good care, over eight years later, I still have them and swear by them.

They come in an array of colors so any home can be fit for aesthetics. You could go with the tint also, they even now have a transparent tint that is equally effective at preventing that heat from coming in. Either of these choices are great options, and you’ll see a significant drop in electric charges when you compare the previous year.

Good luck,

Robert

Question No. 2

I’m part of an HOA board that doesn’t have a whole lot of money, but we have an issue at the carport area, (illustrated separately in pictures).

The fascia board on the carport has been removed, and then there’s another fascia board behind it, about 40 percent of which is also rotted through. The board is saying to leave the fascia (about 40 percent of which is rotted) that is behind the removed fascia, there and just nail on the new fascia to this.

I say, “No way” — fix it all after we first find out why it rotted and fix that, then replace it all. I’m not the expert, but I do need an expert opinion on what we should do, as we’ve been mismanaged for a long time and now it’s just us doing our best managing our property on our own.

Please help,

Darrin G.

Answer No. 2

Darrin, the second board is called a “Rim Board,” and that’s what ties all of the roof joists on the carports together.

This is part of the structural integrity of the carport and if they are rotted/rotting and they aren’t replaced, you’ll be looking over time, at a collapsing roof due to rot… a huge liability.

In the pictures, I see at least 6 that aren’t even tied in at this time due to rot, and the problem is just beginning.

This all needs to be cut out and replaced, as well as a new fascia. I can also see that your drip edge is missing.

This is a flashing detail that goes under the roofing membrane and deflects the water away from the fascia. You’ve got work to do here but if you put the flashing on, replace the needed wood and be sure to prime ALL sides of the rim block and fascia (sounds like overkill but it will help), and maintain the roof by doing maintenance, you will prevent the unnecessary failure of this structure.

Good luck to you and your board, your job isn’t easy.

Robert

Robert Lamoureux has 38 years of experience as a general contractor, with separate licenses in electrical and plumbing contracting. He owns IMS Construction Inc. in Valencia. His opinions are his own, not necessarily those of The Signal. Opinions expressed in this column are not meant to replace the recommendations of a qualified contractor after that contractor has made a thorough visual inspection. Email questions to Robert at robert@imsconstruction.com.