MacArthur transitions to new role at The Master’s University
During chapel on Oct. 27, 2017, Senator Scott Wilk presents The Master's University President Dr. John MacArthur with a plaque while Provost Dr. John Stead looks on to celebrate 90 years since the school was founded. Gina Ender/The Signal
By Brennon Dixson
Monday, October 22nd, 2018

For 33 years, John MacArthur has served as president of The Master’s University and Seminary, but it was announced Monday that he would transition to the position of chancellor of the university and president of the seminary some time in the near future.

The search for MacArthur’s replacement is expected to occur over the next 18 months, meaning MacArthur is still president, “and he will be until we name a new one,” said Brian Harr, the university’s communication director.

“I originally signed up for five years, thinking I would be able — along with my pastoral ministry at Grace Community Church — to help strengthen the university and seminary. I underestimated the hold that educating young Christians for gospel influence on the world would have on me,” MacArthur’s prepared statement reads. “However, with the growth of the university and seminary, demanding more leadership now and in the future, the time has come for me to transition to the position of chancellor of the university and president of the seminary.”

MacArthur’s transition comes of the heels of the college’s announcement that its accreditation is on probation, which resulted from a Western Association of Schools and Colleges report questioning the college’s board independence, personnel and management practices, operational integrity and leadership.

Among the issues cited in the report are allegations of conflicts of interest regarding student financial aid, institutional leaders being hired who lack qualifications for the higher education positions they hold, and what the accreditation agency described as “a disturbing climate of fear, intimidation and bullying” at the university.

In addition, some individuals have been hired without job descriptions being provided or searches being conducted, and other institutional leaders appear to lack higher education experience, preparation and knowledge of key higher education regulatory expectations and professional standards, according to a Western Association of Schools and Colleges panel. “For example, when asked by the visiting team, the (chief operating officer of the college) was unaware of the Clery Act, the Violence Against Women Act and the Family Education Right to Privacy Act.”

“I am confident of the continuing influence of these schools for the kingdom of our Lord and I look forward to continuing to serve The Master’s University and Seminary in the years ahead,” MacArthur said in the letter.

About the author

Brennon Dixson

Brennon Dixson

Brennon Dixson covers education for the Signal. He comes to Santa Clarita from Long Beach, where he was previously employed by the Press Telegram in Long Beach and the Daily Breeze in Torrance.

During chapel on Oct. 27, 2017, Senator Scott Wilk presents The Master's University President Dr. John MacArthur with a plaque while Provost Dr. John Stead looks on to celebrate 90 years since the school was founded. Gina Ender/The Signal

MacArthur transitions to new role at The Master’s University

For 33 years, John MacArthur has served as president of The Master’s University and Seminary, but it was announced Monday that he would transition to the position of chancellor of the university and president of the seminary some time in the near future.

The search for MacArthur’s replacement is expected to occur over the next 18 months, meaning MacArthur is still president, “and he will be until we name a new one,” said Brian Harr, the university’s communication director.

“I originally signed up for five years, thinking I would be able — along with my pastoral ministry at Grace Community Church — to help strengthen the university and seminary. I underestimated the hold that educating young Christians for gospel influence on the world would have on me,” MacArthur’s prepared statement reads. “However, with the growth of the university and seminary, demanding more leadership now and in the future, the time has come for me to transition to the position of chancellor of the university and president of the seminary.”

MacArthur’s transition comes of the heels of the college’s announcement that its accreditation is on probation, which resulted from a Western Association of Schools and Colleges report questioning the college’s board independence, personnel and management practices, operational integrity and leadership.

Among the issues cited in the report are allegations of conflicts of interest regarding student financial aid, institutional leaders being hired who lack qualifications for the higher education positions they hold, and what the accreditation agency described as “a disturbing climate of fear, intimidation and bullying” at the university.

In addition, some individuals have been hired without job descriptions being provided or searches being conducted, and other institutional leaders appear to lack higher education experience, preparation and knowledge of key higher education regulatory expectations and professional standards, according to a Western Association of Schools and Colleges panel. “For example, when asked by the visiting team, the (chief operating officer of the college) was unaware of the Clery Act, the Violence Against Women Act and the Family Education Right to Privacy Act.”

“I am confident of the continuing influence of these schools for the kingdom of our Lord and I look forward to continuing to serve The Master’s University and Seminary in the years ahead,” MacArthur said in the letter.

About the author

Brennon Dixson

Brennon Dixson

Brennon Dixson covers education for the Signal. He comes to Santa Clarita from Long Beach, where he was previously employed by the Press Telegram in Long Beach and the Daily Breeze in Torrance.