Through a set of standards, Oakmont encourages education and activities for its residents
A resident of Oakmont Senior Living Center enjoying the up-close and personal visit with a horse at the Jump for Joy Halloween event. Photo courtesy of Jean Carter and Michael DeValue
By Ryan Mancini
Friday, November 16th, 2018

Each month, Oakmont of Santa Clarita provides a series of activity standards so their residents remain active while also keeping everyone mentally stimulated.

“They were created to have a balance of activity programs here at Oakmont,” said marketing director Mary Dembrowski. “We seal that by incorporating core elements, giving residents a board range of activities.”

With each core element offers weekly classes, games or special field trips for Oakmont residents. Created by owner Cindy Gallaher, residents are given an activity calendar while regularly reminded about what will come up.

Dembrowski added that these activities serve as Oakmont’s compass for giving its residents the chance to stay active in several different ways.

Think
Through this core element, residents can participate in games and discussions designed to “stimulate the mind and encourage engagement,” according to Oakmont’s core elements calendar. This includes brain games, debate, trivia and word games.

Do
Through various chair activities like yoga and volleyball, this core elements pushes residents to stay flexible, strong, balanced and maintain their physical endurance.

Create
With an emphasis on inspiring creativity, this core element provides residents with a chance to channel their interests, from cooking to gardening to singing.

Learn
To further engage the mind, Oakmont provides residents with the chance to continue learning from history through documentaries, lectures and a class on technology.

Socialize
Inherently, social activities are primed to “share fun and entertainment with neighbors and friends,” according to the core elements calendar. This includes bocce ball, bingo, happy hour and parties with guests too.

Experience
For the month of November, Oakmont selected particular places to take residents for trips beyond its walls. Residents have already made trips to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and taken a tour with lunch at the Ojai Olive Oil Company. The month continues with a stop at the Huntington Library and Gardens on Nov. 15 and a visit at the Canyon Theater to see “It’s a Wonderful Life” on Nov. 24.

Contribute
This core element combines craft projects with fundraising for the community. Residents have the option to knit for Operation Gratitude, a nonprofit organization which helps first responders and the U.S. Military, or put together lap blankets to be donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Connect
The last core element gives residents the opportunity to connect back to their faith as an effort “to promote fellowship and spiritual connection,” according to the calendar. This includes Bible study, communion and fellowship hour.

According to Dembrowski, participating in each core element is optional.

For the full list of activity options and days under each core element, go to the community calendar at oakmontofsantaclarita.com.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.

A resident of Oakmont Senior Living Center enjoying the up-close and personal visit with a horse at the Jump for Joy Halloween event. Photo courtesy of Jean Carter and Michael DeValue

Through a set of standards, Oakmont encourages education and activities for its residents

Each month, Oakmont of Santa Clarita provides a series of activity standards so their residents remain active while also keeping everyone mentally stimulated.

“They were created to have a balance of activity programs here at Oakmont,” said marketing director Mary Dembrowski. “We seal that by incorporating core elements, giving residents a board range of activities.”

With each core element offers weekly classes, games or special field trips for Oakmont residents. Created by owner Cindy Gallaher, residents are given an activity calendar while regularly reminded about what will come up.

Dembrowski added that these activities serve as Oakmont’s compass for giving its residents the chance to stay active in several different ways.

Think
Through this core element, residents can participate in games and discussions designed to “stimulate the mind and encourage engagement,” according to Oakmont’s core elements calendar. This includes brain games, debate, trivia and word games.

Do
Through various chair activities like yoga and volleyball, this core elements pushes residents to stay flexible, strong, balanced and maintain their physical endurance.

Create
With an emphasis on inspiring creativity, this core element provides residents with a chance to channel their interests, from cooking to gardening to singing.

Learn
To further engage the mind, Oakmont provides residents with the chance to continue learning from history through documentaries, lectures and a class on technology.

Socialize
Inherently, social activities are primed to “share fun and entertainment with neighbors and friends,” according to the core elements calendar. This includes bocce ball, bingo, happy hour and parties with guests too.

Experience
For the month of November, Oakmont selected particular places to take residents for trips beyond its walls. Residents have already made trips to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and taken a tour with lunch at the Ojai Olive Oil Company. The month continues with a stop at the Huntington Library and Gardens on Nov. 15 and a visit at the Canyon Theater to see “It’s a Wonderful Life” on Nov. 24.

Contribute
This core element combines craft projects with fundraising for the community. Residents have the option to knit for Operation Gratitude, a nonprofit organization which helps first responders and the U.S. Military, or put together lap blankets to be donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Connect
The last core element gives residents the opportunity to connect back to their faith as an effort “to promote fellowship and spiritual connection,” according to the calendar. This includes Bible study, communion and fellowship hour.

According to Dembrowski, participating in each core element is optional.

For the full list of activity options and days under each core element, go to the community calendar at oakmontofsantaclarita.com.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.