Community remembers 34-year-old for Boys & Girls Club involvement
Signal file photo. Rosanna Reyes Randle (front right) served as the Keystone Club president at the Boys & Girls Club. Courtesy of Shina Daniel.
By Gina Ender
Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

Even on her toughest days, Rosanna Reyes Randle was always happy and self-sufficient.

The Santa Clarita resident, who died at age 34 on Aug. 22 from surgery complications, is remembered by her loved ones for her unrelenting joy.

Randle suffered from Moyamoya disease, a rare blood vessel condition caused by blocked arteries at the base of the brain. As a result, she had several strokes, two brain surgeries, kidney failure and had gone completely blind.

Despite all her challenges, Randle continued her fight until her last day when her heart stopped during a procedure to insert a dialysis line.

Until then, Randle’s spirit was unflagging.

While she could have given up, she continued to get around on her own and even learned braille in order to maintain her independence.

“She still had a smile on her face despite all the things she was going through,” her friend Shina Daniel said.

Daniel and Randle met on the Boys & Girls Club traveling basketball team when they were 11 years old and had been like sisters since. The two had spent nearly every day together for about 12 years and remained close after they started their families.

“We clicked and went through all the phases of life together,” she said.

With a heart for giving back, Randle was actively involved in the Boys & Girls Club as a mentor in her adult years and served as the program’s Keystone Club president.

“All the youth went to her to be mentored and ask for advice,” Daniel said. “She was a very integral part of the Santa Clarita Valley community for the youth.”

Ali Campbell, the director of resource development at the Boys & Girls Club, remembers Randle from going to Hart High School together and playing softball at Hart Park. Both as an athlete and a person, Campbell said she remembers Randle’s strength.

“She was a powerful force to be reckoned with, on and off the field,” Campbell said.

Rosanna Reyes Randle was involved in athletics at school and through the Boys & Girls Club. Courtesy of Shina Daniel.

Boys & Girls Club CEO Matt Nelson first met Randle in 2003 when she was working as a teen coordinator and he was education director.

“She was a really great mentor,” Nelson said. “I was impressed with how easily she connected with the teens.”

Randle was caring, outgoing and outspoken, Nelson remembers, and she served as a model for the club’s mission.

“She did what we hope all our alumni will do: to give back to the community by getting involved,” he said.

In addition to her work with the kids at the Boys & Girls Club, Randle had two children of her own, Jordin, age 10 and Trey, age 4.

Rosanna Reyes Randle smiles beside her children Jordin and Trey. Courtesy of Shina Daniel.

In order to pay for Randle’s autopsy and her funeral services, her loved ones are holding a paint-and-sip fundraiser on Sunday, Sept. 3 from 4 to 9 p.m. at the Boys & Girls Club in Newhall.

For $45, attendees will get to paint and have a glass of wine.

Because of Randle’s love of shoes, the painting will be of a Jordan sneaker.

About the author

Gina Ender

Gina Ender

Gina Ender is a journalist covering city government and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in February 2017. You can contact Gina Ender at gender@signalscv.com, 661-287-5525 or follow her on Twitter at @ginaender.

Signal file photo. Rosanna Reyes Randle (front right) served as the Keystone Club president at the Boys & Girls Club. Courtesy of Shina Daniel.

Community remembers 34-year-old for Boys & Girls Club involvement

Even on her toughest days, Rosanna Reyes Randle was always happy and self-sufficient.

The Santa Clarita resident, who died at age 34 on Aug. 22 from surgery complications, is remembered by her loved ones for her unrelenting joy.

Randle suffered from Moyamoya disease, a rare blood vessel condition caused by blocked arteries at the base of the brain. As a result, she had several strokes, two brain surgeries, kidney failure and had gone completely blind.

Despite all her challenges, Randle continued her fight until her last day when her heart stopped during a procedure to insert a dialysis line.

Until then, Randle’s spirit was unflagging.

While she could have given up, she continued to get around on her own and even learned braille in order to maintain her independence.

“She still had a smile on her face despite all the things she was going through,” her friend Shina Daniel said.

Daniel and Randle met on the Boys & Girls Club traveling basketball team when they were 11 years old and had been like sisters since. The two had spent nearly every day together for about 12 years and remained close after they started their families.

“We clicked and went through all the phases of life together,” she said.

With a heart for giving back, Randle was actively involved in the Boys & Girls Club as a mentor in her adult years and served as the program’s Keystone Club president.

“All the youth went to her to be mentored and ask for advice,” Daniel said. “She was a very integral part of the Santa Clarita Valley community for the youth.”

Ali Campbell, the director of resource development at the Boys & Girls Club, remembers Randle from going to Hart High School together and playing softball at Hart Park. Both as an athlete and a person, Campbell said she remembers Randle’s strength.

“She was a powerful force to be reckoned with, on and off the field,” Campbell said.

Rosanna Reyes Randle was involved in athletics at school and through the Boys & Girls Club. Courtesy of Shina Daniel.

Boys & Girls Club CEO Matt Nelson first met Randle in 2003 when she was working as a teen coordinator and he was education director.

“She was a really great mentor,” Nelson said. “I was impressed with how easily she connected with the teens.”

Randle was caring, outgoing and outspoken, Nelson remembers, and she served as a model for the club’s mission.

“She did what we hope all our alumni will do: to give back to the community by getting involved,” he said.

In addition to her work with the kids at the Boys & Girls Club, Randle had two children of her own, Jordin, age 10 and Trey, age 4.

Rosanna Reyes Randle smiles beside her children Jordin and Trey. Courtesy of Shina Daniel.

In order to pay for Randle’s autopsy and her funeral services, her loved ones are holding a paint-and-sip fundraiser on Sunday, Sept. 3 from 4 to 9 p.m. at the Boys & Girls Club in Newhall.

For $45, attendees will get to paint and have a glass of wine.

Because of Randle’s love of shoes, the painting will be of a Jordan sneaker.

About the author

Gina Ender

Gina Ender

Gina Ender is a journalist covering city government and breaking news in the Santa Clarita Valley. She joined The Signal as a staff writer in February 2017. You can contact Gina Ender at gender@signalscv.com, 661-287-5525 or follow her on Twitter at @ginaender.