Accused street racer gets probation, fines and community service
File photo: Tire marks cover the road on Constellation Road in Valencia, near where actor Paul Walker was killed in a car crash on Nov. 30, 2013. A recent street racing operation in the area recently netted more than 100 arrests, many of which were addressed in court Thursday. Katharine Lotze/Signal
By Jim Holt
Friday, December 1st, 2017

A 32-year-old cook from Canyon Country is the third man accused of taking part in an illegal street race to receive a probationary sentence and ordered to do community service.

This past week, Christian Ramirezsalvador pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor count of engaging in a motor vehicle speed contest on a highway, Ricardo Santiago, spokesman for the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office told The Signal Thursday.

Ramirezsalvador was fined $355 plus court fees and ordered to pay $150 in restitution, Santiago said. He was also sentenced to 40 hours community service and 12 months summary probation.

This past summer, deputies with the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station and California Highway Patrol officers came together in a joint forces effort to put the brakes on street racing in the Santa Clarita Valley, arresting or citing at least 109 people at an illegal street racing event in Castaic,

A total of 102 arrests were made for participating or simply watching the illegal speed event, California Highway Patrol Captain Edward Krusey told The Signal on June 30.

Seven people including Ramirezsalvador were arrested for organizing the illegal event or driving in it.

Two of the same seven accused men received similar judgements in court.

Johannes Michael Hansel, 19, of Canyon Country, was charged on Sept. 25 with one misdemeanor count each of engaging in motor vehicle exhibition of speed on a highway, reckless driving on a highway and being a spectator at an illegal motor vehicle speed contest or exhibition.

When he appeared in court last week, he entered a plea.

“He pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor count each of engaging in a motor vehicle speed contest on a highway, reckless driving on a highway, being a spectator at an illegal motor vehicle contest or exhibition,” according to Santiago said.

“He was entered into a diversion program, ordered to complete 10 days of community service, (and the proceedings (were) suspended for 12 months,” he added.

A third man arrested on suspicion of taking part in an illegal street race made a similar plea in September.

On Sept. 25, Redwin Padua, 21, of Castaic, identified as one of the seven key players in the June 30 street racing event was charged with one misdemeanor count each of engaging in motor vehicle exhibition of speed on a highway and reckless driving on a highway.

The next day, on Sept. 26 at the Santa Clarita Courthouse, Padua pleaded no contest to both charges and entered into a diversion program, as opposed to serving any jail time.

“He entered into a Judicial Diversion program over our objections,” Santiago said.

The option for people charged with a misdemeanor of avoiding jail and “entering a diversion program” gained traction in 2014 when Assembly Bill 2124 put Los Angeles County on a 6-year pilot program.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

on Twitter @jamesarthurholt

About the author

Jim Holt

Jim Holt

File photo: Tire marks cover the road on Constellation Road in Valencia, near where actor Paul Walker was killed in a car crash on Nov. 30, 2013. A recent street racing operation in the area recently netted more than 100 arrests, many of which were addressed in court Thursday. Katharine Lotze/Signal

Accused street racer gets probation, fines and community service

A 32-year-old cook from Canyon Country is the third man accused of taking part in an illegal street race to receive a probationary sentence and ordered to do community service.

This past week, Christian Ramirezsalvador pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor count of engaging in a motor vehicle speed contest on a highway, Ricardo Santiago, spokesman for the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office told The Signal Thursday.

Ramirezsalvador was fined $355 plus court fees and ordered to pay $150 in restitution, Santiago said. He was also sentenced to 40 hours community service and 12 months summary probation.

This past summer, deputies with the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station and California Highway Patrol officers came together in a joint forces effort to put the brakes on street racing in the Santa Clarita Valley, arresting or citing at least 109 people at an illegal street racing event in Castaic,

A total of 102 arrests were made for participating or simply watching the illegal speed event, California Highway Patrol Captain Edward Krusey told The Signal on June 30.

Seven people including Ramirezsalvador were arrested for organizing the illegal event or driving in it.

Two of the same seven accused men received similar judgements in court.

Johannes Michael Hansel, 19, of Canyon Country, was charged on Sept. 25 with one misdemeanor count each of engaging in motor vehicle exhibition of speed on a highway, reckless driving on a highway and being a spectator at an illegal motor vehicle speed contest or exhibition.

When he appeared in court last week, he entered a plea.

“He pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor count each of engaging in a motor vehicle speed contest on a highway, reckless driving on a highway, being a spectator at an illegal motor vehicle contest or exhibition,” according to Santiago said.

“He was entered into a diversion program, ordered to complete 10 days of community service, (and the proceedings (were) suspended for 12 months,” he added.

A third man arrested on suspicion of taking part in an illegal street race made a similar plea in September.

On Sept. 25, Redwin Padua, 21, of Castaic, identified as one of the seven key players in the June 30 street racing event was charged with one misdemeanor count each of engaging in motor vehicle exhibition of speed on a highway and reckless driving on a highway.

The next day, on Sept. 26 at the Santa Clarita Courthouse, Padua pleaded no contest to both charges and entered into a diversion program, as opposed to serving any jail time.

“He entered into a Judicial Diversion program over our objections,” Santiago said.

The option for people charged with a misdemeanor of avoiding jail and “entering a diversion program” gained traction in 2014 when Assembly Bill 2124 put Los Angeles County on a 6-year pilot program.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

on Twitter @jamesarthurholt