Prosecutors investigating how SCV deputy handled a sexual battery claim
Signal file photo.
By Jim Holt
Wednesday, February 28th, 2018

 

The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office is investigating a Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station deputy over how he handled a sexual battery claim filed by a woman.

“A case was presented to our office regarding Deputy (Josh) Clark, and it is under review,” Greg Risling, a spokesman for the DA’s Office, told The Signal Wednesday.

Deputy Josh Clark, a 12-year veteran with the SCV Sheriff’s Station, was placed on paid administrative leave in January 2017, after sheriff’s officials learned of complaints filed over his handling of a sexual battery report.

An immediate internal review of the complaint filed against him was launched when he was suspended, Capt. Darren Harris of the LASD’s Information Bureau told The Signal on Wednesday.

Results of the internal probe were turned over to the D.A.’s Office in September 2017.

“When we became aware of the allegations we took those allegations seriously,” he said. “We have conducted an investigation and have submitted that report to the District Attorney’s Justice System Integrity branch and they will make a determination as to whether any charges are relevant.”

Just one month before he was suspended, on Nov. 29, 2016, Clark spoke to SCV Sheriff’s Station spokeswoman Shirley Miller about his career aspirations when she asked him what goals he had with the department.

“Motors,” he told her in an interview posted on the LASD’s Recruitment Unit page. “I’ve been riding motorcycles since I was 4 years old. So, definitely, I’m taking my next test with them and try to go for that.

“The Aero Bureau also, I wouldn’t mind being up there, seeing everything but from up in the air. That would be a total experience. I think that would be a fun job,” Clark told Miller on the video which was posted on the SCV Sheriff’s social media site.”

Clark receives a regular annual pay of $92,080, according to Transparent California.  In 2016, according to publicly disclosed state information, he was paid a total of $185,940 including overtime and benefits.

“We expect all of our officers to exercise a high set of professional standards. We’re not saying he (Clark) didn’t, but allegations like this are investigated,” he said. “Hopefully, we’ll have a resolution soon.”

Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, said she would be disclosing details about Clark and the internal probe later today.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

On Twitter @jamesarthurholt

 

 

 

About the author

Jim Holt

Jim Holt

Signal file photo.

Prosecutors investigating how SCV deputy handled a sexual battery claim

 

The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office is investigating a Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station deputy over how he handled a sexual battery claim filed by a woman.

“A case was presented to our office regarding Deputy (Josh) Clark, and it is under review,” Greg Risling, a spokesman for the DA’s Office, told The Signal Wednesday.

Deputy Josh Clark, a 12-year veteran with the SCV Sheriff’s Station, was placed on paid administrative leave in January 2017, after sheriff’s officials learned of complaints filed over his handling of a sexual battery report.

An immediate internal review of the complaint filed against him was launched when he was suspended, Capt. Darren Harris of the LASD’s Information Bureau told The Signal on Wednesday.

Results of the internal probe were turned over to the D.A.’s Office in September 2017.

“When we became aware of the allegations we took those allegations seriously,” he said. “We have conducted an investigation and have submitted that report to the District Attorney’s Justice System Integrity branch and they will make a determination as to whether any charges are relevant.”

Just one month before he was suspended, on Nov. 29, 2016, Clark spoke to SCV Sheriff’s Station spokeswoman Shirley Miller about his career aspirations when she asked him what goals he had with the department.

“Motors,” he told her in an interview posted on the LASD’s Recruitment Unit page. “I’ve been riding motorcycles since I was 4 years old. So, definitely, I’m taking my next test with them and try to go for that.

“The Aero Bureau also, I wouldn’t mind being up there, seeing everything but from up in the air. That would be a total experience. I think that would be a fun job,” Clark told Miller on the video which was posted on the SCV Sheriff’s social media site.”

Clark receives a regular annual pay of $92,080, according to Transparent California.  In 2016, according to publicly disclosed state information, he was paid a total of $185,940 including overtime and benefits.

“We expect all of our officers to exercise a high set of professional standards. We’re not saying he (Clark) didn’t, but allegations like this are investigated,” he said. “Hopefully, we’ll have a resolution soon.”

Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, said she would be disclosing details about Clark and the internal probe later today.

jholt@signalscv.com

661-287-5527

On Twitter @jamesarthurholt