Sheriff’s Station hosting drug take-back event Feb. 15
Signal File photo: Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital hosts a Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday. The Sheriff's Station is hosting a similar event next Thursday. Nikolas Samuels/The Signal
By Perry Smith
Friday, February 9th, 2018

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station officials are hosting a drug take-back event Thursday, Feb. 15, according to station officials.

Residents are invited to bring unwanted, unused or expired prescription drugs to the Sheriff’s Station for disposal, with no questions asked, per officials.

Participants are asked to put medications in a sealed bag for drop-off, and they can then bring them to the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station, which was located at 23740 Magic Mountain Parkway.

The drop-off times will take place from 8-11 a.m.

Illicit drugs, biohazard waste, needles and other sharps will not be accepted at the curbside drop-off.

Residents may dispose of needles and syringes in the sharps disposal receptacle that is located in front of the Sheriff’s Station.  

Back in October, Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital announced it also hosts a drug take-back program that takes place year-round.

The collection receptacle is located in the main lobby of the hospital and offers the opportunity for anyone to deposit unused prescription medicines there seven days a week, during hospital visiting hours, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Improper disposal of unused medications today takes many forms, from flushing down the toilet or pouring in the drain, to throwing in the garbage or worse, according to hospital officials. More often than not, the end result is damage to our environment, drug diversion or the drugs being abused by others.

Henry Mayo also mentioned the following facts that highlight the need for these types of events:  

The programs aim to offer a convenient and safe disposal of pharmaceuticals, environmental protection from drug residue in our water, and to mitigate prescription drug abuse.

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Perry Smith

Perry Smith

Signal File photo: Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital hosts a Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday. The Sheriff's Station is hosting a similar event next Thursday. Nikolas Samuels/The Signal

Sheriff’s Station hosting drug take-back event Feb. 15

Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station officials are hosting a drug take-back event Thursday, Feb. 15, according to station officials.

Residents are invited to bring unwanted, unused or expired prescription drugs to the Sheriff’s Station for disposal, with no questions asked, per officials.

Participants are asked to put medications in a sealed bag for drop-off, and they can then bring them to the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station, which was located at 23740 Magic Mountain Parkway.

The drop-off times will take place from 8-11 a.m.

Illicit drugs, biohazard waste, needles and other sharps will not be accepted at the curbside drop-off.

Residents may dispose of needles and syringes in the sharps disposal receptacle that is located in front of the Sheriff’s Station.  

Back in October, Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital announced it also hosts a drug take-back program that takes place year-round.

The collection receptacle is located in the main lobby of the hospital and offers the opportunity for anyone to deposit unused prescription medicines there seven days a week, during hospital visiting hours, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Improper disposal of unused medications today takes many forms, from flushing down the toilet or pouring in the drain, to throwing in the garbage or worse, according to hospital officials. More often than not, the end result is damage to our environment, drug diversion or the drugs being abused by others.

Henry Mayo also mentioned the following facts that highlight the need for these types of events:  

  • 40 million Americans in major metropolitan areas have pharmaceutical chemicals and hormones in their drinking water.
  • 71,000 children are seen in emergency departments every year due to accidental ingestion of medications.
  • Every day 2,500 teens abuse prescription pain relievers for the first time.
  • 16,000 people die every year from heroin and cocaine; 22,000 die from prescription drugs.

The programs aim to offer a convenient and safe disposal of pharmaceuticals, environmental protection from drug residue in our water, and to mitigate prescription drug abuse.