Newhall’s The MAIN to hold discussion for artists about taxes
Courtesy Photo
By Ryan Mancini
Saturday, August 18th, 2018

With the guidance of an expert, artists can find new ways to handle their taxes at the upcoming “Taxes and the Artist,” a free discussion 7 p.m. Thursday at the MAIN in Old Town Newhall.

Leading the discussion will be tax expert Scott Rubenstein. While giving advice on how to work on taxes, normally a more somber topic for many, Rubenstein said he hopes to make it memorable through the use of humor.

“I hope that they feel that they’ve learned something and feel more relaxed on business and taxes,” he said Friday.

Rubenstein is co-owner of L.A. Tax Service, which specializes in helping people who work in the entertainment business and those who file self-employed tax returns.

Guests are expected to learn what to write off as an expense, determine particular taxes to pay and how to work effectively and within the law, according to a news release from the city of Santa Clarita.

With experience as a television writer for shows like “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” he has developed his writing using humor, and he said he wants to do the same for artists regarding humor and taxes. Through this technique, the discussion can help artists who are typically self-employed and are uncomfortable about mathematics, he said.

“People usually end up with a fun way to remember things,” he said.

As a part of the New Heights: Development Workshop series, this discussion is intended to “engage creative individuals, no matter what level of experience,” according to the Santa Clarita Arts website. The series is presented as part of Thursdays@Newhall.

The event is free to attend and no RSVP is required.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.

Courtesy Photo

Newhall’s The MAIN to hold discussion for artists about taxes

With the guidance of an expert, artists can find new ways to handle their taxes at the upcoming “Taxes and the Artist,” a free discussion 7 p.m. Thursday at the MAIN in Old Town Newhall.

Leading the discussion will be tax expert Scott Rubenstein. While giving advice on how to work on taxes, normally a more somber topic for many, Rubenstein said he hopes to make it memorable through the use of humor.

“I hope that they feel that they’ve learned something and feel more relaxed on business and taxes,” he said Friday.

Rubenstein is co-owner of L.A. Tax Service, which specializes in helping people who work in the entertainment business and those who file self-employed tax returns.

Guests are expected to learn what to write off as an expense, determine particular taxes to pay and how to work effectively and within the law, according to a news release from the city of Santa Clarita.

With experience as a television writer for shows like “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” he has developed his writing using humor, and he said he wants to do the same for artists regarding humor and taxes. Through this technique, the discussion can help artists who are typically self-employed and are uncomfortable about mathematics, he said.

“People usually end up with a fun way to remember things,” he said.

As a part of the New Heights: Development Workshop series, this discussion is intended to “engage creative individuals, no matter what level of experience,” according to the Santa Clarita Arts website. The series is presented as part of Thursdays@Newhall.

The event is free to attend and no RSVP is required.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.