Two sets of Wildcat triplets
Two sets of triplets on the West Ranch High School Marching Band & Color Guard. The Delgadillo triplets, from left, Caitlyn, Cameron and Carmen. The Cardenas triplets from left, Luliana, Michael and Daniel.
By Michele Lutes
Monday, October 29th, 2018

Six students at West Ranch High School have something special in common, other than being Wildcats. They’re all in the marching band and color guard — and they have one other trait in common.

Between the two families, the Delgadillo and the Cadenas, there two sets of triplets.

The Delgadillo family’s 15-year-old sophomores, Caitlyn and Carmen are in color guard, and their brother Cameron is in the band, playing clarinet in the woodwind section.

They all followed in their brother, Christian’s footsteps — he was in West Ranch’s music program in all four years of high school before graduating in 2018.

Parents, Terrie and Michael support each of their kids to the fullest. “Michael is the equipment manager for the high school marching band,” said Terrie Delgadillo. “He is in charge of building props and arranging drivers for their trailers and does most repairs and maintenance on all their trailers and equipment.”

And the Cardenas family’s 14-year-old freshmen are all percussionists. Michael and Luliana are in the Front Ensemble playing vibraphone and synthesizer, respectively, and Daniel plays bass drum No. 4.

“My triplets amaze me every day,” said their mother, Gabriela Cardenas.

Both families have lived in Santa Clarita since the two sets of triplets were born, and both families have seen their children find a love for music throughout the years.

“The best thing about being a triplet is always having someone there for you, to have your back and someone to help you when you need it,” they all agreed in a recent statement.

“When I’m in a strange place where I don’t know anyone, my brothers are there so I have two people to keep me company,” Luliana Cardenas said.

Identical or fraternal, they believe they don’t look that much alike.

“We don’t look that much alike and people still get our names mixed up,” Caitlyn Delgadillo said. Her and her brother and sisters names all start with the letter, “C” and they are often called the wrong name.

Besides being called someone else’s name, the six students agree the worst things about being a triplet are having two siblings annoying you at once, and they’re always around when you need some space.

Space will soon come for the triplets, as they leave the nest within the next few years.

Mothers Terrie Degadillo and Gabriela Cardenas said they’ll miss them, no matter where they go for college.

The Delgadillo’s, oldest son, Christian was last year’s Drum Major at West Ranch, and is already off to college, Terrie Degadillo said. When the time comes for her triplets to leave, “It will be triple the sadness, but also triple the pride,” she said.

The Cardenas have three years before their only children all leave the nest.

Gabbie Cardenas said she already misses them while they’re away all day. “This is what, as parents, we will have worked for and be thankful for. “

About the author

Michele Lutes

Michele Lutes

Two sets of triplets on the West Ranch High School Marching Band & Color Guard. The Delgadillo triplets, from left, Caitlyn, Cameron and Carmen. The Cardenas triplets from left, Luliana, Michael and Daniel.

Two sets of Wildcat triplets

Six students at West Ranch High School have something special in common, other than being Wildcats. They’re all in the marching band and color guard — and they have one other trait in common.

Between the two families, the Delgadillo and the Cadenas, there two sets of triplets.

The Delgadillo family’s 15-year-old sophomores, Caitlyn and Carmen are in color guard, and their brother Cameron is in the band, playing clarinet in the woodwind section.

They all followed in their brother, Christian’s footsteps — he was in West Ranch’s music program in all four years of high school before graduating in 2018.

Parents, Terrie and Michael support each of their kids to the fullest. “Michael is the equipment manager for the high school marching band,” said Terrie Delgadillo. “He is in charge of building props and arranging drivers for their trailers and does most repairs and maintenance on all their trailers and equipment.”

And the Cardenas family’s 14-year-old freshmen are all percussionists. Michael and Luliana are in the Front Ensemble playing vibraphone and synthesizer, respectively, and Daniel plays bass drum No. 4.

“My triplets amaze me every day,” said their mother, Gabriela Cardenas.

Both families have lived in Santa Clarita since the two sets of triplets were born, and both families have seen their children find a love for music throughout the years.

“The best thing about being a triplet is always having someone there for you, to have your back and someone to help you when you need it,” they all agreed in a recent statement.

“When I’m in a strange place where I don’t know anyone, my brothers are there so I have two people to keep me company,” Luliana Cardenas said.

Identical or fraternal, they believe they don’t look that much alike.

“We don’t look that much alike and people still get our names mixed up,” Caitlyn Delgadillo said. Her and her brother and sisters names all start with the letter, “C” and they are often called the wrong name.

Besides being called someone else’s name, the six students agree the worst things about being a triplet are having two siblings annoying you at once, and they’re always around when you need some space.

Space will soon come for the triplets, as they leave the nest within the next few years.

Mothers Terrie Degadillo and Gabriela Cardenas said they’ll miss them, no matter where they go for college.

The Delgadillo’s, oldest son, Christian was last year’s Drum Major at West Ranch, and is already off to college, Terrie Degadillo said. When the time comes for her triplets to leave, “It will be triple the sadness, but also triple the pride,” she said.

The Cardenas have three years before their only children all leave the nest.

Gabbie Cardenas said she already misses them while they’re away all day. “This is what, as parents, we will have worked for and be thankful for. “