Newsom, Harris bring GOTV bus tour to Santa Clarita, voice support for Hill, Smith
Gavin Newsom, candidate for Governor of California speaks at the podium as he is applauded by, from left, wife, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Katie Hill, candidate for Congress, Kamala Harris - U.S. Senator and Christy Smith, candidate for Assembly during a campaign rally held at the Newhall Family Theater in Newhall on Saturday, November 3rd, 2018. Dan Watson/The Signal
By Ryan Mancini
Saturday, November 3rd, 2018

California gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom and U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris came to the Santa Clarita Valley to campaign for congressional candidate Katie Hill and Assembly candidate Christy Smith at the Newhall Family Theatre on Saturday.

The rally served as a stop for Newsom’s Get Out the Vote, or GOTV tour to visit Democratic candidates all across the state.

“This is an amazing moment,” Smith said. “And this is a moment where I think we have all realized, and we’ve been realizing for about two years, that this moment is bigger than any one of us.”

Hill said a few hundred votes could make the difference in how the election concludes.

“It’s fundamental,” she said. “This is how people have a voice, and I think this election — this is a chance for us to know that our vote matters.”

Newsom hopes Americans, especially millennials, will look to issues that matter to them as an incentive to vote, including gun safety, climate change and health care, as well as the kind of future voters want, he said.

“I think the senator said it best today during this rally,” he said. “I mean, this is not who we are. It’s not reflected at least in the nightly news, certainly not being reflected in the White House and Washington, D.C., right now. We’re better than this.”

Newsom said the happiest people he sees in the state are people who already voted.

“It’s an empowering experience,” he said. “If you haven’t done it, test it, I think you’ll actually enjoy it.”

As Harris spoke to the audience, she said it was a moment of inflection, about looking within at an individual and community level. As she concluded, Harris said voters should not be convinced of the “us versus them” narrative, and that moment will pass.

“I’m hearing that folks are really disturbed because this rhetoric is not really reflective of who we are as a country,” she said to reporters. “Most Americans, I think, feel very strongly that we have so much more in common than what separates us and that they want leaders who recognize that and then deal with core issues.”

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.

Gavin Newsom, candidate for Governor of California speaks at the podium as he is applauded by, from left, wife, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Katie Hill, candidate for Congress, Kamala Harris - U.S. Senator and Christy Smith, candidate for Assembly during a campaign rally held at the Newhall Family Theater in Newhall on Saturday, November 3rd, 2018. Dan Watson/The Signal

Newsom, Harris bring GOTV bus tour to Santa Clarita, voice support for Hill, Smith

California gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom and U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris came to the Santa Clarita Valley to campaign for congressional candidate Katie Hill and Assembly candidate Christy Smith at the Newhall Family Theatre on Saturday.

The rally served as a stop for Newsom’s Get Out the Vote, or GOTV tour to visit Democratic candidates all across the state.

“This is an amazing moment,” Smith said. “And this is a moment where I think we have all realized, and we’ve been realizing for about two years, that this moment is bigger than any one of us.”

Hill said a few hundred votes could make the difference in how the election concludes.

“It’s fundamental,” she said. “This is how people have a voice, and I think this election — this is a chance for us to know that our vote matters.”

Newsom hopes Americans, especially millennials, will look to issues that matter to them as an incentive to vote, including gun safety, climate change and health care, as well as the kind of future voters want, he said.

“I think the senator said it best today during this rally,” he said. “I mean, this is not who we are. It’s not reflected at least in the nightly news, certainly not being reflected in the White House and Washington, D.C., right now. We’re better than this.”

Newsom said the happiest people he sees in the state are people who already voted.

“It’s an empowering experience,” he said. “If you haven’t done it, test it, I think you’ll actually enjoy it.”

As Harris spoke to the audience, she said it was a moment of inflection, about looking within at an individual and community level. As she concluded, Harris said voters should not be convinced of the “us versus them” narrative, and that moment will pass.

“I’m hearing that folks are really disturbed because this rhetoric is not really reflective of who we are as a country,” she said to reporters. “Most Americans, I think, feel very strongly that we have so much more in common than what separates us and that they want leaders who recognize that and then deal with core issues.”

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.