Walk through Congregation Beth Shalom’s holiday boutique
Ken Hans, center, Brenda Hans and Francine Hans-Vince sold barbecue sauce and craft items at the CBS 2018 Holiday Boutique. Ryan Mancini/The Signal
By Ryan Mancini
Sunday, November 18th, 2018

Congregation Beth Shalom welcomed its 18th annual holiday boutique, bringing small businesses and families together on Sunday.

This year’s boutique had a full set of vendors on display, said Carol Bloom, director of early childhood education. Although Congregation Beth Shalom conducts an annual spring boutique before Mothers Day, Bloom said this is regularly their biggest boutique of the year.

“We’re small enough but big enough,” she said.

Handmade items on sale included blankets, jewelry, books from the Scholastic book fair, origami owls, hats, scarves and Tupperware.

Ken Hans, owner of KJ’s BBQ Sauce, said his wife Brenda found out about the boutique through Facebook before they signed up to participate. Brenda, along with cousin Francine Hans-Vince, also sold kitchen items through their company Crafty Cousins.

“I think most people who come to these events are looking for, especially during the holiday season, holiday gifts,” he said. “A lot of it’s very social too. I’ve seen a lot of people, a lot of friends come through.”

Erin Burgess, left, and her daughter Avery sell Eavies, skin protectors for tactile pants, while at Congregation Beth Shalom’s holiday boutique. Ryan Mancini/The Signal

Across from their table, Hannah Jacobs sold soap. The proprietor of Martelle Hand-Crafted Soaps, Jacobs sold soaps meant for people with sensitive skin that were glycerin- or goats milk-based. She grew up unable to use soaps with fragrance oils until she started using hydrosols, natural fragrances derived from plants.

She began her business at 12 years old, and is now a 16-year-old Valencia High School student.

“I decided to form a business out of it so other people like me can actually smell like stuff,” she said.

Guests could also order items that vendors were out of stock or did not sell at the boutique, Bloom said.

“All of the proceeds go to preschool parent council, which takes care of all of our enrichment classes and all of our activities that are handled,” she said.

Those proceeds also go to upcoming activities at Congregation Beth Shalom, including their upcoming Thanksgiving feast on Nov. 21.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.

Ken Hans, center, Brenda Hans and Francine Hans-Vince sold barbecue sauce and craft items at the CBS 2018 Holiday Boutique. Ryan Mancini/The Signal

Walk through Congregation Beth Shalom’s holiday boutique

Congregation Beth Shalom welcomed its 18th annual holiday boutique, bringing small businesses and families together on Sunday.

This year’s boutique had a full set of vendors on display, said Carol Bloom, director of early childhood education. Although Congregation Beth Shalom conducts an annual spring boutique before Mothers Day, Bloom said this is regularly their biggest boutique of the year.

“We’re small enough but big enough,” she said.

Handmade items on sale included blankets, jewelry, books from the Scholastic book fair, origami owls, hats, scarves and Tupperware.

Ken Hans, owner of KJ’s BBQ Sauce, said his wife Brenda found out about the boutique through Facebook before they signed up to participate. Brenda, along with cousin Francine Hans-Vince, also sold kitchen items through their company Crafty Cousins.

“I think most people who come to these events are looking for, especially during the holiday season, holiday gifts,” he said. “A lot of it’s very social too. I’ve seen a lot of people, a lot of friends come through.”

Erin Burgess, left, and her daughter Avery sell Eavies, skin protectors for tactile pants, while at Congregation Beth Shalom’s holiday boutique. Ryan Mancini/The Signal

Across from their table, Hannah Jacobs sold soap. The proprietor of Martelle Hand-Crafted Soaps, Jacobs sold soaps meant for people with sensitive skin that were glycerin- or goats milk-based. She grew up unable to use soaps with fragrance oils until she started using hydrosols, natural fragrances derived from plants.

She began her business at 12 years old, and is now a 16-year-old Valencia High School student.

“I decided to form a business out of it so other people like me can actually smell like stuff,” she said.

Guests could also order items that vendors were out of stock or did not sell at the boutique, Bloom said.

“All of the proceeds go to preschool parent council, which takes care of all of our enrichment classes and all of our activities that are handled,” she said.

Those proceeds also go to upcoming activities at Congregation Beth Shalom, including their upcoming Thanksgiving feast on Nov. 21.

About the author

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini

Ryan Mancini covers local news for The Signal. He joined in 2018, previously working as a reporter and editor for The Sundial, Scene Magazine and El Nuevo Sol while a student at California State University, Northridge, where he studied journalism and political science. He's lived in Santa Clarita since 2002.