Robert Lamoureux: Pool questions, underground garage safety

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Question No. 1 

I live in Valencia. We had a pool put in about two months ago and now all of a sudden the Jacuzzi is turning an awful green! The pool guy is saying that it isn’t a big deal, that it’s just a chemical reaction but I don’t agree, it seems like something is wrong. The water seems OK but the white plaster walls are now green and we don’t know what to do. Where do we turn to get this fixed since the current pool guy says that all is OK and no big deal? 

Mike R. 

Answer No. 1 

Mike, 

You’ve got an issue that sounds like the pool man didn’t set the chemical base correctly and this term is called, “flipped.” There is obviously a copper manifold coming off of the heater. It is this copper that is impregnating itself into the plaster. If your chemicals aren’t perfect this is exactly what can happen especially on a new pool because the plaster is so porous. They’re going to need to drain it, acid wash it and start from scratch again. I recommend that if your current pool man isn’t aware of this you may want to interview a few more so that you get one with the best knowledge base, especially with new pools. 

Good luck. 

Robert

Question No. 2 

Hi Robert, 

I live in Canyon Country and have a pool that I’ve maintained on my own for many years and have been very successful at it. I’m getting tired and want to automate some, and have heard of these inline chlorinators that you can put the tablets in. I just need your opinion if you know about these, on their quality and success. 

Monica R. 

Answer No. 2 

Monica, 

Those are great especially for automating things. My only negative is that over the years the circulating tubes will get crusted up and eventually plug, therefore it’ll be a maintenance issue. In the long run, though, with you being so handy and wanting to get away from the daily grind with the pool, this is something that would likely be worth it for you. I would recommend though, that if you are going to the trouble to install, that you go with a commercial grade so that your hands-on time will be even less. They’re a bit taller and will accept the 3-inch pucks, and you can perform maintenance on the tubes about every six months by disconnecting the inlet tubes and removing any crusted material, then reconnecting. 

Good luck to you. 

Robert

Question No. 3 

I live in Santa Clarita where there is an underground parking garage. Our HOA decided to change all of the locks, which I’m fine with, but now you need a key to get in or out of the garage. Is this OK and safe? I would think that in an emergency, needing a key to get out could pose a serious safety issue. Please let me know so that I can inform the board and we can all be adequately protected. 

Doreen M. 

Answer No. 3 

Doreen, no this is not OK. There needs to be at least one point of egress to the exterior, which all persons can access. You cannot entrap people in an area like a parking garage. Please notify the management company so that they can take action immediately. The liability is huge on something like this. It needs to be repaired immediately. They’ll need to have one of the doors changed to an “A80” function, which means that someone can open it from the inside without a key or FOB. I would expect change to that immediately and if you don’t make good headway in this process, reach out to the Fire Department and they’ll definitely get the ball rolling as this is a serious safety matter. Good call on this, and good luck.

Robert

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