Showers hit SCV

A man wears a plastic poncho as he walks on Lyons Avenue in Newhall as rain begins to fall on Saturday afternoon. Dan Watson/The Signal
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In case you missed it, the Santa Clarita Valley was treated to a bit of rain Wednesday, which is expected to clear up by the weekend, according to weather officials.

Scattered showers and thunderstorms were expected throughout Santa Clarita and the rest of Los Angeles County into Wednesday night, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Tom Fisher.

The weather system may persist into Thursday, but should clear up over the course of the day, with a forecast that calls for a dry weekend, he said.

“This weather pattern and intensity should begin to diminish by Wednesday evening, but don’t rule out any overnight showers, especially as the wind shifts as the flow moves onshore,” Fisher said. “This should move out of the area the end of (Thursday), and we’re looking at a weekend of near-normal to slightly below-normal temperatures.”

Fisher also said the National Weather Service has picked up a low-pressure system moving in that will hit from next Wednesday through Sunday, thus affecting Thanksgiving weekend, but it’s too early to tell what kind of weather it will bring.

“Right now, we have very low confidence on what exactly that is: Is it going to be a dry, windy event or is it going to be a repeat of these onshore showers?” he said. “The position and trajectory of the system really matters, because if it comes straight over land from the north, we end up with wind, and if we come over water, we have a chance of rain, and it can also be anything in between. We’ll have a little more clarity and confidence about that system within a few days. This time of year, we call the ‘transition season,’ when the weather is changing between summer and fall and we have two temperature masses fighting.” 

It also makes the pattern tougher to predict, he said. 

“Weather conditions can flip-flop really fast,” Fisher said, “so long-range accuracy is not very good this time of year.”

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