Heat warning issued for Santa Clarita until Saturday

A Ruby-Throated hummingbird approaches a feeder in Castaic.
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An extreme heat warning was issued Thursday for the Santa Clarita and San Fernando valley areas by the Los Angeles County Public Health Department. 

The heat wave is caused by high pressure over the entire West Coast, according to meteorologist Eric Bolbt of the National Weather Service. High pressure builds between storm systems, creating what Bolbt described as a “dome of hot air.”

Public Health officials have placed the Santa Clarita Valley on an extreme heat warning until Saturday. However, temperatures are predicted to decline after Friday. The high for Friday is expected to reach at least 105 degrees, according to the forecast.

“(Thursday and Friday) are the hottest two days expected.” Said Eric Bolbt, “It’s going to bring triple-digit temperatures to the Santa Clarita Valley, and very warm at night, especially to temperatures in the 70s, sometimes the lower 80s, as the minimum temperatures.”

Though there is an increase in smoke coming down from Northern and Central California, an air quality warning has not yet been issued to the Santa Clarita Valley.  

A hummingbird approaches a feeder in Castaic, exhibiting a greenish-gray throat patch which indicates it might be a female or younger bird. Help hummingbirds in extreme heat by placing feeders in the shade. Dan Watson/The signal

A helping hand for Mother Nature

While temperatures remain high, it is advised to remain hydrated and limit going outside during the hottest hours.

Extreme heat causes hummingbirds to eat less and lose their appetite and become lethargic.

Hummingbird Bliss.com offers the following tips for your feeders:

Help hummingbirds in extreme heat by placing feeders in the shade. Properly clean feeders on a regular basis and reduce the ratio of sugar to water. Hot weather creates the perfect environment for bacteria and mold growth. Reduce ratio of sugar to water.

Add a birdbath or make water available. Water your yard regularly. Brightly colored flowers and tubular flowering plants attract the birds and offer the most nectar and moisture.

To obtain a list of all cooling center locations, visit ready.lacounty.gov/heat or call 211.

A hummingbird approaches a feeder in Castaic, exhibiting a greenish-gray throat patch which indicates it might be a female or younger bird. Dan Watson/The signal

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