Lois Eisenberg: A word of caution

By Signal Contributor

Last update: Friday, March 3rd, 2017

Regarding the article “37 cited for crosswalk violations” on the front page of Friday’s Signal: The results of this “sting” operation at three separate intersections demonstrates a most disturbing act of negligence and failure to be aware.

Most motorists don’t realize, or just don’t care, that when a car is stopped at a crosswalk it is for a purpose, that motorists are required to yield the right of way to the pedestrian crossing.

In fact, when seeing a vehicle stopped in the middle of the street you should take the same precaution as if a pedestrian is crossing.

A pedestrian should also take extra precaution when entering a crosswalk in case the motorist is not going to stop. A pedestrian should be aware of traffic coming from either side; always assume the cars are not going to stop and judge the crossing with caution.

Be hesitant when you feel that a car is going too fast approaching the crosswalk for it to be safe to cross.

This problem of motorists failing to stop for pedestrians or pedestrians failing to pay attention to motorists has become more prevalent due to the cellphone and texting craze.

It is not the cellphone or the cars causing this distraction but the motorist who is the culprit, driving the car while using this communication device.

To the motorist and pedestrians alike: Please proceed with caution.

 

Click here to post a comment

Lois Eisenberg: A word of caution

Regarding the article “37 cited for crosswalk violations” on the front page of Friday’s Signal: The results of this “sting” operation at three separate intersections demonstrates a most disturbing act of negligence and failure to be aware.

Most motorists don’t realize, or just don’t care, that when a car is stopped at a crosswalk it is for a purpose, that motorists are required to yield the right of way to the pedestrian crossing.

In fact, when seeing a vehicle stopped in the middle of the street you should take the same precaution as if a pedestrian is crossing.

A pedestrian should also take extra precaution when entering a crosswalk in case the motorist is not going to stop. A pedestrian should be aware of traffic coming from either side; always assume the cars are not going to stop and judge the crossing with caution.

Be hesitant when you feel that a car is going too fast approaching the crosswalk for it to be safe to cross.

This problem of motorists failing to stop for pedestrians or pedestrians failing to pay attention to motorists has become more prevalent due to the cellphone and texting craze.

It is not the cellphone or the cars causing this distraction but the motorist who is the culprit, driving the car while using this communication device.

To the motorist and pedestrians alike: Please proceed with caution.

 

Signal Contributor

Signal Contributor