Lila Littlejohn: The next 30 years in Santa Clarita
The City of Santa Clarita's 30 year anniversary logo on the grass in Valencia Glen Park on Saturday, Sept. 16. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal
By Lila Littlejohn
Friday, September 22nd, 2017

Certain recent events at the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration remind those who have been in the Santa Clarita Valley long enough just how alienating things were before residents rose up and – in a series of hurry-up-and-wait anecdotes – formed the city of Santa Clarita 30 years ago this Dec. 15.

Specifically, those recent county Hall of Administration events were the Board of Supervisors’ approval of the Chiquita Canyon Landfill expansion on June 27, followed by the county’s approval July 18 of two Newhall Ranch phases on the West Side.

In both cases, we at The Signal heard complaints from readers about long waits to lodge public complaints that were given minimal time and even less attention by supervisors with – according to complaining residents – mostly cavalier attitudes and minds apparently already made up on the matter.

Such was the nature of all “local” government 30 years ago, when everything was decided in downtown Los Angeles and little of it was to local residents’ liking.

Now Santa Clarita is ramping up a 30-year celebration marking its victory in setting itself aside from L.A. County’s development-driven philosophy, starting with its first city ordinance – preserving native oak trees.

You think development’s bad now? You should have seen it then.

The nascent city set out its own agenda to increase the number and amenities of parks, to serve SCV children and families, and to promote safety and law-and-order.

Much has changed since then. Santa Clarita has expanded to become the third largest in Los Angeles County, mostly through annexation. New divisions have erupted among residents; several disasters have been survived by most of us; urban problems have presented themselves.

As we look ahead during the close of the city’s first three decades, we invite the current crop of Santa Clarita Valley residents to share their visions for the city’s next 30 years. Where would you like to see Santa Clarita 10, 20 or 30 years from now in terms of community, transportation, governance, jobs, technology, education, or any other areas of concern or interest for you?

Send us a letter to the editor or column to letters@signalscv.com. Include your name, address and phone number. We publish only name and home town.

Together, let’s plan an even better second 30 years for Santa Clarita.

Lila Littlejohn
Signal Opinion Editor

About the author

Lila Littlejohn

Lila Littlejohn

The City of Santa Clarita's 30 year anniversary logo on the grass in Valencia Glen Park on Saturday, Sept. 16. Christian Monterrosa/ The Signal

Lila Littlejohn: The next 30 years in Santa Clarita

Certain recent events at the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration remind those who have been in the Santa Clarita Valley long enough just how alienating things were before residents rose up and – in a series of hurry-up-and-wait anecdotes – formed the city of Santa Clarita 30 years ago this Dec. 15.

Specifically, those recent county Hall of Administration events were the Board of Supervisors’ approval of the Chiquita Canyon Landfill expansion on June 27, followed by the county’s approval July 18 of two Newhall Ranch phases on the West Side.

In both cases, we at The Signal heard complaints from readers about long waits to lodge public complaints that were given minimal time and even less attention by supervisors with – according to complaining residents – mostly cavalier attitudes and minds apparently already made up on the matter.

Such was the nature of all “local” government 30 years ago, when everything was decided in downtown Los Angeles and little of it was to local residents’ liking.

Now Santa Clarita is ramping up a 30-year celebration marking its victory in setting itself aside from L.A. County’s development-driven philosophy, starting with its first city ordinance – preserving native oak trees.

You think development’s bad now? You should have seen it then.

The nascent city set out its own agenda to increase the number and amenities of parks, to serve SCV children and families, and to promote safety and law-and-order.

Much has changed since then. Santa Clarita has expanded to become the third largest in Los Angeles County, mostly through annexation. New divisions have erupted among residents; several disasters have been survived by most of us; urban problems have presented themselves.

As we look ahead during the close of the city’s first three decades, we invite the current crop of Santa Clarita Valley residents to share their visions for the city’s next 30 years. Where would you like to see Santa Clarita 10, 20 or 30 years from now in terms of community, transportation, governance, jobs, technology, education, or any other areas of concern or interest for you?

Send us a letter to the editor or column to letters@signalscv.com. Include your name, address and phone number. We publish only name and home town.

Together, let’s plan an even better second 30 years for Santa Clarita.

Lila Littlejohn
Signal Opinion Editor