Why the SCVEDC relies on job clustering
Retired CHP officer Erwin Holmes hugs Elyse Taylor, daughter of fallen CHP officer Roger Gore, following a ceremony to rededicate a memorial for the four officers who lost their lives in 1970's Newhall Incident at the California Highway Patrol's Newhall offices on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. Katharine Lotze/The Signal
By Danny Diaz
Thursday, April 5th, 2018

The SCVEDC employs a cluster-based job creation and retention strategy. This “clustering” of businesses improves job creation by fueling proximity and competition in the local economy. Close proximity of interconnected businesses can create a highly-skilled and versatile workforce due to employee transfers from one segment of the industry to another, and increased competition within the cluster can encourage the right environment for continuous improvement and rampant innovation.

The SCVEDC targets the following clusters:

Advanced Manufacturing

The Santa Clarita Valley is home to businesses involved in the production of goods that require advanced inputs and manufacturing processes. The outputs produced by firms such as Stratasys Direct Manufacturing and Honda Performance Development are diverse and range from 3D printing technology to engines and industrial machinery.

Aerospace & Defense

The Aerospace & Defense industry is focused on parts manufacturing, space research and national security/international affairs. Businesses are supported by COC’s Center for Applied Competitive Technologies, which has placed students at companies including Woodward and Aerospace Dynamics International.

Medical Devices

The SCV enjoys a reputation as a national leader in the discovery and engineering of noteworthy advancements in the medical device field and is headquarters of cutting-edge companies including Boston Scientific and Advanced Bionics.

Digital Media & Entertainment

The SCV hosts production companies, studios and movie ranches for filming dozens of commercials, television shows and feature films, representing hundreds of shooting days each year. Our community of artists and technicians is supported by the world’s premier academic institutions for the arts, CalArts.

Information Technology

The rapidly evolving landscape of IT requires firms to engage in new software publishing techniques, telecommunications, data processing and cloud design. The SCV is becoming the “silicon suburb” as technology companies, such as Scorpion and WayForward, realize the cost and quality of life benefits of being located here.

Headquarters & Professional Services

The highly educated population and great quality of life makes this an appealing location for corporate headquarters and the professional service firms that assist all our businesses. The SCV has long been home to the headquarters of Princess Cruises and will be joined in 2019 by Logix Federal Credit Union.

The region continues to augment its changing status from bedroom community to jobs center, and the SCVEDC emphasizes growth in its target business clusters to ensure a strong and diverse economy.

Holly Schroeder is president and CEO of the SCVEDC.

About the author

Danny Diaz

Danny Diaz

Retired CHP officer Erwin Holmes hugs Elyse Taylor, daughter of fallen CHP officer Roger Gore, following a ceremony to rededicate a memorial for the four officers who lost their lives in 1970's Newhall Incident at the California Highway Patrol's Newhall offices on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. Katharine Lotze/The Signal

Why the SCVEDC relies on job clustering

The SCVEDC employs a cluster-based job creation and retention strategy. This “clustering” of businesses improves job creation by fueling proximity and competition in the local economy. Close proximity of interconnected businesses can create a highly-skilled and versatile workforce due to employee transfers from one segment of the industry to another, and increased competition within the cluster can encourage the right environment for continuous improvement and rampant innovation.

The SCVEDC targets the following clusters:

Advanced Manufacturing

The Santa Clarita Valley is home to businesses involved in the production of goods that require advanced inputs and manufacturing processes. The outputs produced by firms such as Stratasys Direct Manufacturing and Honda Performance Development are diverse and range from 3D printing technology to engines and industrial machinery.

Aerospace & Defense

The Aerospace & Defense industry is focused on parts manufacturing, space research and national security/international affairs. Businesses are supported by COC’s Center for Applied Competitive Technologies, which has placed students at companies including Woodward and Aerospace Dynamics International.

Medical Devices

The SCV enjoys a reputation as a national leader in the discovery and engineering of noteworthy advancements in the medical device field and is headquarters of cutting-edge companies including Boston Scientific and Advanced Bionics.

Digital Media & Entertainment

The SCV hosts production companies, studios and movie ranches for filming dozens of commercials, television shows and feature films, representing hundreds of shooting days each year. Our community of artists and technicians is supported by the world’s premier academic institutions for the arts, CalArts.

Information Technology

The rapidly evolving landscape of IT requires firms to engage in new software publishing techniques, telecommunications, data processing and cloud design. The SCV is becoming the “silicon suburb” as technology companies, such as Scorpion and WayForward, realize the cost and quality of life benefits of being located here.

Headquarters & Professional Services

The highly educated population and great quality of life makes this an appealing location for corporate headquarters and the professional service firms that assist all our businesses. The SCV has long been home to the headquarters of Princess Cruises and will be joined in 2019 by Logix Federal Credit Union.

The region continues to augment its changing status from bedroom community to jobs center, and the SCVEDC emphasizes growth in its target business clusters to ensure a strong and diverse economy.

Holly Schroeder is president and CEO of the SCVEDC.