COC adds more degree paths for students
FILE PHOTO: Members of the 2017 graduating class march in to begin the College of the Canyons commencement ceremony held in the Honor Grove at College of the Canyons in Valencia on June 2. Dan Watson/For the Signal
By Tammy Murga
Thursday, August 23rd, 2018

College of the Canyons is adding associate degrees for transfer, so students beginning this fall have a wider pathway designed for a quicker, smoother transfer to both public and private four-year institutions, COC announced Wednesday.

For the 2018-19 academic year, the college will offer the four additional degree options in environmental science, public health, hospitality management and social justice studies.

Currently, COC offers 24 degrees designed to guarantee a clear pathway to a California State University major and baccalaureate degree. With the addition of the four degree options, COC will continue to lead as one of community colleges in the state offering the most degrees for transfer.

The degree subjects chosen depend on the labor market demand, said Omar Torres, interim associate vice president of academic affairs at COC.

“If there’s demand in a particular area, we do a program analysis and create courses and the actual degree,” said Torres. “We go through a fairly rigorous progress. We don’t just want to create any degree. It’s an intentional process.”

Torres added that the college is looking into offering anthropology and engineering degrees in the coming future.

These degrees do not guarantee admission to a specific campus or major, but the program offers students the opportunity to complete a bachelor’s degree with 60 semester units or 90 quarter units of coursework beyond the associate degree. Students have a catalog of 36 private, nonprofit four-year colleges and universities to transfer to in California.

The addition of private institutions now accepting associate degrees for transfer came in July under an agreement with the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities.

Over the course of five years, the number of students who completed a degree increased by more than 100 percent and the number of students who transferred to a four-year school increased by 25 percent.
Torres believes that with the continuous addition of degree options, those percentages will grow.

COC Chancellor Dianne Van Hook said she looks forward to the expansion of partnerships with four-year colleges and universities “to eliminate achievement gaps and increase transfer rates across the state for the students we serve.”

For more information about ADTs, visit the college’s web page on academic majors. Information about degree programs in the University Center can be found at the UCEN web page.

 

About the author

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga covers community news for The Signal. She joined in the summer of 2018, previously working in Northern California as an assistant editor and reporter for the Lake County Record-Bee. In 2016, she graduated from Mount Saint Mary's University, Los Angeles with a degree in Journalism. Have a story you'd for like her to cover? Message her on Twitter or at tmurga@signalscv.com.

FILE PHOTO: Members of the 2017 graduating class march in to begin the College of the Canyons commencement ceremony held in the Honor Grove at College of the Canyons in Valencia on June 2. Dan Watson/For the Signal

COC adds more degree paths for students

College of the Canyons is adding associate degrees for transfer, so students beginning this fall have a wider pathway designed for a quicker, smoother transfer to both public and private four-year institutions, COC announced Wednesday.

For the 2018-19 academic year, the college will offer the four additional degree options in environmental science, public health, hospitality management and social justice studies.

Currently, COC offers 24 degrees designed to guarantee a clear pathway to a California State University major and baccalaureate degree. With the addition of the four degree options, COC will continue to lead as one of community colleges in the state offering the most degrees for transfer.

The degree subjects chosen depend on the labor market demand, said Omar Torres, interim associate vice president of academic affairs at COC.

“If there’s demand in a particular area, we do a program analysis and create courses and the actual degree,” said Torres. “We go through a fairly rigorous progress. We don’t just want to create any degree. It’s an intentional process.”

Torres added that the college is looking into offering anthropology and engineering degrees in the coming future.

These degrees do not guarantee admission to a specific campus or major, but the program offers students the opportunity to complete a bachelor’s degree with 60 semester units or 90 quarter units of coursework beyond the associate degree. Students have a catalog of 36 private, nonprofit four-year colleges and universities to transfer to in California.

The addition of private institutions now accepting associate degrees for transfer came in July under an agreement with the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities.

Over the course of five years, the number of students who completed a degree increased by more than 100 percent and the number of students who transferred to a four-year school increased by 25 percent.
Torres believes that with the continuous addition of degree options, those percentages will grow.

COC Chancellor Dianne Van Hook said she looks forward to the expansion of partnerships with four-year colleges and universities “to eliminate achievement gaps and increase transfer rates across the state for the students we serve.”

For more information about ADTs, visit the college’s web page on academic majors. Information about degree programs in the University Center can be found at the UCEN web page.

 

About the author

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga covers community news for The Signal. She joined in the summer of 2018, previously working in Northern California as an assistant editor and reporter for the Lake County Record-Bee. In 2016, she graduated from Mount Saint Mary's University, Los Angeles with a degree in Journalism. Have a story you'd for like her to cover? Message her on Twitter or at tmurga@signalscv.com.