October’s NextSCV highlights how to ‘brand for the future’
By Tammy Murga
Friday, October 26th, 2018

Adapting to change is not always the easiest, especially for those in the business world. Young Santa Clarita Valley professionals had the chance to learn how to adapt “to change without losing your voice,” the topic of NextSCV’s October event.

On Wednesday, guests anywhere from ages 21 through 40 gathered at the Hyatt Regency Valencia heard tips and experiences on branding from hotel representatives and the Santa Clarita Magazine publishers.

From the Hyatt Regency, general manager Mark Kirsch and senior sales manager Joelyn Caprine shared how the hotel is turning things around as it celebrates 20 years as “Santa Clarita’s most prominent hotel.”

But how does it remain that way?

“Re-branding,” said Kirsch, who joined the team in mid-May. “I want to re-vitalize this hotel to not only go after the folks that have been coming here for years but also the millennials.”

To accommodate the broader target market, Kirsch and Caprine shared several changes that have already taken place and what is still to come.

Its all about detail, including ditching the previous color schemes of yellows and reds with whites and purples to the hotel has 244 newly renovated guestrooms and 16 suites.

Set for early December, the hotel plans to open a high-end sushi restaurant and bar, titled the Greater Pacific. Kirsch said he plans to help bring cabanas and bring more entertainment.

With many upgrades underway, “letting people know what is happening at the Hyatt” is probably the most important task in undergoing a successful re-brand, said Caprine.

She and her team have spent time networking with other local businesses and partners, like Princess Cruises, the city of Santa Clarita and the SCV Economic Development Corporation.

“This helps us find out what we can do better, too,” Caprine said.

Santa Clarita Magazine publishers Linda Hafizi and her son Alexander shared how the publication started and its success over the past 25 years.

Linda and husband Mo released its first publication in 1990 under a different name, Mistletoe and Holly. After the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the family came out with the Magazine of Santa Clarita and recently re-branded to the Santa Clarita Magazine to “give it an updated look,” which came with a new website.

When changing the look that was in place for more than two decades, Alexander said it’s important to reassure customers that “the change will be a positive one.”

“This is important for any kind of service,” Linda added. “You have to make people happy, or else they’ll go somewhere else.”

To help attendees reflect on their brands, Renee Leon of NextSCV ended the event posing these questions:

“What results do you want to achieve in the next year? What do you wish to be known for and what are you doing right now to achieve this?”

About the author

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga covers city hall and business for The Signal. She joined in the summer of 2018, previously working in Northern California as an assistant editor and reporter for the Lake County Record-Bee. In 2016, she graduated from Mount Saint Mary's University, Los Angeles. Have a story tip? Message her on Twitter or at tmurga@signalscv.com.

October’s NextSCV highlights how to ‘brand for the future’

Adapting to change is not always the easiest, especially for those in the business world. Young Santa Clarita Valley professionals had the chance to learn how to adapt “to change without losing your voice,” the topic of NextSCV’s October event.

On Wednesday, guests anywhere from ages 21 through 40 gathered at the Hyatt Regency Valencia heard tips and experiences on branding from hotel representatives and the Santa Clarita Magazine publishers.

From the Hyatt Regency, general manager Mark Kirsch and senior sales manager Joelyn Caprine shared how the hotel is turning things around as it celebrates 20 years as “Santa Clarita’s most prominent hotel.”

But how does it remain that way?

“Re-branding,” said Kirsch, who joined the team in mid-May. “I want to re-vitalize this hotel to not only go after the folks that have been coming here for years but also the millennials.”

To accommodate the broader target market, Kirsch and Caprine shared several changes that have already taken place and what is still to come.

Its all about detail, including ditching the previous color schemes of yellows and reds with whites and purples to the hotel has 244 newly renovated guestrooms and 16 suites.

Set for early December, the hotel plans to open a high-end sushi restaurant and bar, titled the Greater Pacific. Kirsch said he plans to help bring cabanas and bring more entertainment.

With many upgrades underway, “letting people know what is happening at the Hyatt” is probably the most important task in undergoing a successful re-brand, said Caprine.

She and her team have spent time networking with other local businesses and partners, like Princess Cruises, the city of Santa Clarita and the SCV Economic Development Corporation.

“This helps us find out what we can do better, too,” Caprine said.

Santa Clarita Magazine publishers Linda Hafizi and her son Alexander shared how the publication started and its success over the past 25 years.

Linda and husband Mo released its first publication in 1990 under a different name, Mistletoe and Holly. After the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the family came out with the Magazine of Santa Clarita and recently re-branded to the Santa Clarita Magazine to “give it an updated look,” which came with a new website.

When changing the look that was in place for more than two decades, Alexander said it’s important to reassure customers that “the change will be a positive one.”

“This is important for any kind of service,” Linda added. “You have to make people happy, or else they’ll go somewhere else.”

To help attendees reflect on their brands, Renee Leon of NextSCV ended the event posing these questions:

“What results do you want to achieve in the next year? What do you wish to be known for and what are you doing right now to achieve this?”

About the author

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga

Tammy Murga covers city hall and business for The Signal. She joined in the summer of 2018, previously working in Northern California as an assistant editor and reporter for the Lake County Record-Bee. In 2016, she graduated from Mount Saint Mary's University, Los Angeles. Have a story tip? Message her on Twitter or at tmurga@signalscv.com.