Canyon Country native serves at Aviation Rescue Swimmer School

Airman Apprentice Joaquin Bodero, a native of Canyon Country, serves at the Navy's Aviation Rescue Swimmer School. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Patricia Elkins, Navy Office of Community Outreach
Airman Apprentice Joaquin Bodero, a native of Canyon Country, serves at the Navy's Aviation Rescue Swimmer School. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Patricia Elkins, Navy Office of Community Outreach
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By Megan Brown 
Navy Office of Community Outreach 

PENSACOLA, Fla. – Airman Apprentice Joaquin Bodero, a native of Canyon Country, serves at the Navy’s Aviation Rescue Swimmer School. 

“I learned in my hometown to always be the best at what I do and that being my best does not always mean being first,” said Bodero. “In the Navy, you always want to show what you are capable of, and being the best shows that you are improving and giving it your all.” 

Bodero joined the Navy a few months after graduating from Canyon High School in June. 

“I joined the Navy to challenge myself,” said Bodero. “I needed to do something bigger than me to prove that I am capable of achieving anything I put my mind to.” 

Aviation Rescue Swimmer School provides initial aviation water survival training and CPR qualification to all preflight student naval aviators and student naval flight officers, student flight surgeons, naval aircrew candidates, student aviators from other branches of the U.S. Armed Forces and international student aviators. Aviation rescue swimmers serve in treacherous conditions to complete life-saving missions like evacuating families during a storm, rescuing a crew off of a ship in the Pacific Coast or saving mountain climbers.  

“Having a cadre of students who are eager to learn and extremely hardworking, ensures we offer the best and brightest to naval aviation and the Aviation Rescue Swimmer community,” said Capt. Brad Arthur, commanding officer, Naval Aviation Schools Command.   

“I am most proud of graduating boot camp,” said Bodero. “I can say those were the longest 10 weeks. A lot of people don’t have the courage and commitment to go through those 10 weeks to become a sailor so I’m proud of myself for accomplishing that.” 

Bodero takes pride in serving in the U.S. Navy. 

“Serving in the Navy means a lot to me,” said Bodero. “Being able to make a change in the world and having the ability to protect others means everything to me.” 

Bodero is grateful to others for helping make a Navy career possible. 

“I want to thank my mom, Irza, for supporting me with my decision to join and for always making sure that I always have somewhere to go to when times get rough,” added Bodero. 

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