Finding your sweet spot
Metro Creative
By Hans Kersting, Golf Professional
Friday, January 5th, 2018

How much do you focus on striking the sweet spot on your golf clubs?

It may sound like a silly question, but I’m always amazed at how rarely that idea is a focus during practice sessions for many golfers. Rather than focusing on the sweet spot, most players instead focus on the idea of hitting the ball farther, and straighter.

By finding that sweet spot, you will begin hitting the ball farther, and straighter.

Have you ever jumped on a trampoline?

If you have, you should remember that jumping in the center of the trampoline allows you to jump higher. This is the same effect your golf ball has when it strikes the center of your club.  But how do you know if you strike the sweet spot?

In order to focus on striking the sweet spot on your golf club during practice, you need to keep a damp towel with you. Before each shot you hit, use that towel to clean off your clubface.

Once you hit your shot, take a look at your clubface and check for the contact spot. Sometimes that spot will be towards the hosel, while other times it may be out towards the “toe” of the club.  Without recognizing the point of contact, you will have a difficult time improving upon this contact position.

If you notice that your contact is consistently near the hosel of your club, that is a sign that you are too close to the golf ball as you are making contact.

On the other hand, if your contact is consistently near the toe of the club, that is a sign that you are too far from the golf ball as you are making contact.

A great way to improve this contact position is to start with short pitch shots. Using one of your wedges, practice pitching the ball about 25-30 yards. Focus on the quality of contact with these shots.  Again, keeping your damp towel nearby to clean off your club between shots.

If your contact is near the hosel, focus on sitting a bit further away from the ball as you are making contact.  If your contact is near the toe, focus on being a bit closer to the ball as you are making contact.

We all want to hit golf shots that look and feel great.  By becoming more aware of your contact position on the clubface, you can begin to strike the sweet spot more often.

About the author

Hans Kersting

Hans Kersting, Golf Professional

Metro Creative

Finding your sweet spot

How much do you focus on striking the sweet spot on your golf clubs?

It may sound like a silly question, but I’m always amazed at how rarely that idea is a focus during practice sessions for many golfers. Rather than focusing on the sweet spot, most players instead focus on the idea of hitting the ball farther, and straighter.

By finding that sweet spot, you will begin hitting the ball farther, and straighter.

Have you ever jumped on a trampoline?

If you have, you should remember that jumping in the center of the trampoline allows you to jump higher. This is the same effect your golf ball has when it strikes the center of your club.  But how do you know if you strike the sweet spot?

In order to focus on striking the sweet spot on your golf club during practice, you need to keep a damp towel with you. Before each shot you hit, use that towel to clean off your clubface.

Once you hit your shot, take a look at your clubface and check for the contact spot. Sometimes that spot will be towards the hosel, while other times it may be out towards the “toe” of the club.  Without recognizing the point of contact, you will have a difficult time improving upon this contact position.

If you notice that your contact is consistently near the hosel of your club, that is a sign that you are too close to the golf ball as you are making contact.

On the other hand, if your contact is consistently near the toe of the club, that is a sign that you are too far from the golf ball as you are making contact.

A great way to improve this contact position is to start with short pitch shots. Using one of your wedges, practice pitching the ball about 25-30 yards. Focus on the quality of contact with these shots.  Again, keeping your damp towel nearby to clean off your club between shots.

If your contact is near the hosel, focus on sitting a bit further away from the ball as you are making contact.  If your contact is near the toe, focus on being a bit closer to the ball as you are making contact.

We all want to hit golf shots that look and feel great.  By becoming more aware of your contact position on the clubface, you can begin to strike the sweet spot more often.

About the author

Hans Kersting

Hans Kersting, Golf Professional