Brian Baker: Political Kabuki in the anti-gun debate, rants
By Brian Baker
Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

“Kabuki… Kabuki theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers… Kabuki is a term used by American political pundits as a synonym for political posturing” — Wikipedia

Another day, another anti-gun screed.

Or—as was the case on March 29—when The Signal published a letter by Richard Myers, entitled “No fear of guns,” and a column by Anthony Breznican, entitled “Stop saying that Parkland students are fakes, actors.”

Myers’ letter was a reaction to my column of March 15 (“The Second Amendment and the Militia”) in which I outlined the legal and historical context of gun rights. He didn’t even try to dispute any of the facts in my column, he simply indulged in an emotional outburst echoing the standard anti-gun talking points.

“As for your claim that we need a present day unorganized militia in the event our government becomes tyrannical, I can only say—baloney”, he rants.

Well, OK.

I’m probably not going to get a flat tire, either, but I still keep a spare in my trunk. Better to have a spare tire—or a gun—and not need it, than to need one and not have it.

Breznican’s column is allegedly a rebuttal of one by Ron Bischof that was published on March 22 as “Talking about school safety.”

Breznican writes: “…writer Ron Bischof suggests a conspiracy theory….”

But, in reality, Bischof does no such thing. What he actually says is: “Isn’t it rational to conclude they’re being orchestrated by media producers and other organizations with political objectives?”

After all, if the news media is truly objective, as Breznican suggests when he writes: “When those individuals don’t wish to be interviewed, it’s important and ethical to respect that. When they actually do want to talk, it’s vital to listen”, then why haven’t the major news media been giving any attention at all to the many Parkland survivors who hold views opposing those being expressed by the kids whose faces are plastered all over the place while screeching for gun confiscation?

That’s not a “conspiracy”—It’s political Kabuki.

The fact is that according to a USA Today/Ipsos poll taken after the shooting fewer than half of teens between the ages of 13 and 17 think more gun laws would prevent mass shootings. But, we don’t hear much of anything about them.

That’s because the worker bees of the major media are, by a very large margin, living their lives in the left-wing echo chamber. Antipathy to gun rights is in their nature and their culture, so their natural inclination is to seek out and publicize those who agree with, and validate, their own prejudices and agenda.

It’s so ingrained that it doesn’t need a “conspiracy;” the script is already well-rehearsed.

Political Kabuki.

As to Breznican’s various other claims about the Supreme Court Heller decision and how Congress should act and all of that, it’s interesting to note that retired (thankfully) Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens wrote an op-ed column published in the March 27 edition of the New York Times in which he calls for the repeal of the Second Amendment.

Though I vehemently oppose such a repeal, and think it has absolutely zero chance of actually happening—just look at any map and tell me where enough states would approve such a thing—I do think his column does something important.

It’s one of the very rare instances when an anti-gunner proposes substantive changes to gun laws in a way that actually conforms to the Constitution. And, it puts the lie to the constant refrain of “We support your right to own a gun, BUT…”.

Stevens’s column was Kabuki-free.

Brian Baker is a Saugus resident.

About the author

Brian Baker

Brian Baker

Brian Baker: Political Kabuki in the anti-gun debate, rants

“Kabuki… Kabuki theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers… Kabuki is a term used by American political pundits as a synonym for political posturing” — Wikipedia

Another day, another anti-gun screed.

Or—as was the case on March 29—when The Signal published a letter by Richard Myers, entitled “No fear of guns,” and a column by Anthony Breznican, entitled “Stop saying that Parkland students are fakes, actors.”

Myers’ letter was a reaction to my column of March 15 (“The Second Amendment and the Militia”) in which I outlined the legal and historical context of gun rights. He didn’t even try to dispute any of the facts in my column, he simply indulged in an emotional outburst echoing the standard anti-gun talking points.

“As for your claim that we need a present day unorganized militia in the event our government becomes tyrannical, I can only say—baloney”, he rants.

Well, OK.

I’m probably not going to get a flat tire, either, but I still keep a spare in my trunk. Better to have a spare tire—or a gun—and not need it, than to need one and not have it.

Breznican’s column is allegedly a rebuttal of one by Ron Bischof that was published on March 22 as “Talking about school safety.”

Breznican writes: “…writer Ron Bischof suggests a conspiracy theory….”

But, in reality, Bischof does no such thing. What he actually says is: “Isn’t it rational to conclude they’re being orchestrated by media producers and other organizations with political objectives?”

After all, if the news media is truly objective, as Breznican suggests when he writes: “When those individuals don’t wish to be interviewed, it’s important and ethical to respect that. When they actually do want to talk, it’s vital to listen”, then why haven’t the major news media been giving any attention at all to the many Parkland survivors who hold views opposing those being expressed by the kids whose faces are plastered all over the place while screeching for gun confiscation?

That’s not a “conspiracy”—It’s political Kabuki.

The fact is that according to a USA Today/Ipsos poll taken after the shooting fewer than half of teens between the ages of 13 and 17 think more gun laws would prevent mass shootings. But, we don’t hear much of anything about them.

That’s because the worker bees of the major media are, by a very large margin, living their lives in the left-wing echo chamber. Antipathy to gun rights is in their nature and their culture, so their natural inclination is to seek out and publicize those who agree with, and validate, their own prejudices and agenda.

It’s so ingrained that it doesn’t need a “conspiracy;” the script is already well-rehearsed.

Political Kabuki.

As to Breznican’s various other claims about the Supreme Court Heller decision and how Congress should act and all of that, it’s interesting to note that retired (thankfully) Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens wrote an op-ed column published in the March 27 edition of the New York Times in which he calls for the repeal of the Second Amendment.

Though I vehemently oppose such a repeal, and think it has absolutely zero chance of actually happening—just look at any map and tell me where enough states would approve such a thing—I do think his column does something important.

It’s one of the very rare instances when an anti-gunner proposes substantive changes to gun laws in a way that actually conforms to the Constitution. And, it puts the lie to the constant refrain of “We support your right to own a gun, BUT…”.

Stevens’s column was Kabuki-free.

Brian Baker is a Saugus resident.