Duane Mooring | The Real Immigration Crisis

Letters to the Editor
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In response to Byron York’s June 26 column, “What Now, Border Crisis Deniers?” Byron York’s columns keep coming and they don’t improve. This time he laments the denials that a crisis exists on the U.S. southern border with Mexico. He cites 26 examples of crisis deniers from many quarters. PEW Research Center data indicates that U.S. unauthorized immigrant totals have declined steadily since 2005. If there is a new emerging crisis it’s better described as a crisis in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador and a crisis in managing asylum requests. 

Conditions today are almost exactly as they were from 1845 to 1855 when over 1.5 million refugees from the Irish potato famine arrived at U.S. ports. The arrivals were poor, unskilled and often unable to speak English. There was a lot of prejudice against the arrivals as they sometimes boosted city populations by as much as a third. But the U.S.A. muddled through and we don’t today harbor any prejudices against those arrivals and their descendants. They are contributors and part of the fabric of our wonderfully diverse American landscape. All York’s column does is add to the hysteria and mean-spirited reputation of the Trumpian hordes. 

I worked for the past decade and a half at a banking data center. We had four huge floors in a building packed with cubicles. As you walked among the cubicles and looked at the name plates, you’d be lucky to ever see a name that wasn’t Indian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Middle-Eastern, etc. The bank was a powerhouse of green card processing. The crisis that exists today is that so few native-born Americans can qualify to fill either high-tech or low-tech jobs. Let’s work on that crisis.

Duane Mooring

Castaic

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